Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and plasma concentrations of lipid peroxidation in premenopausal women

Audrey J. Gaskins, Alisha J. Rovner, Sunni L. Mumford, Edwina Yeung, Richard W. Browne, Maurizio Trevisan, Neil J. Perkins, Jean Wactawski-Wende, Enrique F. Schisterman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: A Mediterranean diet has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. A possible mechanism is through a decrease in lipid peroxidation (LPO); however, evidence linking the Mediterranean diet with lower LPO in premenopausal women is sparse. Objective: We investigated whether adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with lower LPO concentrations in premenopausal women. Design: Two hundred fifty-nine healthy women aged 18-44 y were followed for ≤2 menstrual cycles. Plasma concentrations of F2-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF2α), 9-hydroxyoctadecadieneoic acid (9-HODE), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured ≤8 times per cycle at visits scheduled by using fertility monitors. Diet was assessed ≤4 times per cycle by using 24-h dietary recalls. The alternate Mediterranean Diet Score (aMED) (range: 0-9) was calculated on the basis of intake of vegetables, legumes, fruit, nuts, whole grains, red and processed meat, fish, and alcohol and the ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fat. Results: A 1-unit increase in aMED was associated with a 4.50% decrease in 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations (95% CI: -6.32%, 22.65%) and a 14.01% decrease in 9-HODE concentrations (95% CI: -17.88%, -9.96%) after adjustment for energy intake, age, race, body mass index, plasma ascorbic acid, and serum cholesterol. No significant association was observed between aMED and TBARS. A 1-unit increase in aMED was associated with a 1.39% increase (95% CI: 0.07%, 2.72%) in plasma ascorbic acid concentrations. Conclusions: Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with lower LPO and higher ascorbic acid concentrations. These results confirm that decreased LPO is a plausible mechanism linking a Mediterranean diet to reduced cardiovascular disease risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1461-1467
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume92
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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    Gaskins, A. J., Rovner, A. J., Mumford, S. L., Yeung, E., Browne, R. W., Trevisan, M., Perkins, N. J., Wactawski-Wende, J., & Schisterman, E. F. (2010). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and plasma concentrations of lipid peroxidation in premenopausal women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 92(6), 1461-1467. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.110.000026