Addressing Police Occupational Safety during an Opioid Crisis: The Syringe Threat and Injury Correlates (STIC) Score

Leo Beletsky, Daniela Abramovitz, Jaime Arredondo, Pieter Baker, Irina Artamonova, Phil Marotta, Maria Luisa Mittal, Teresita Rocha-Jimenez, Javier A. Cepeda, Mario Morales, Erika Clairgue, Thomas A. Patterson, Steffanie A. Strathdee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective:To develop and validate syringe threat and injury correlates (STIC) score to measure police vulnerability to needlestick injury (NSI).Methods:Tijuana police officers (N = 1788) received NSI training (2015 to 2016). STIC score incorporates five self-reported behaviors: syringe confiscation, transportation, breaking, discarding, and arrest for syringe possession. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between STIC score and recent NSI.Results:Twenty-three (1.5%) officers reported NSI; higher among women than men (3.8% vs 1.2%; P = 0.007). STIC variables had high internal consistency, a distribution of 4.0, a mode of 1.0, a mean (sd) of 2.0 (0.8), and a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 2.0 (1.2 to 2.6). STIC was associated with recent NSI; odds of NSI being 2.4 times higher for each point increase (P-value <0.0001).Conclusions:STIC score is a novel tool for assessing NSI risk and prevention program success among police.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-51
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • law enforcement
  • needle stick injury
  • occupational safety
  • police

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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