Addressing College Drinking as a Statewide Public Health Problem: Key Findings From the Maryland Collaborative

Amelia M. Arria, David H. Jernigan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Excessive drinking among college students is a serious and pervasive public health problem. Although much research attention has focused on developing and evaluating evidence-based practices to address college drinking, adoption has been slow. The Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems was established in 2012 to bring together a network of institutions of higher education in Maryland to collectively address college drinking by using both individual-level and environmental-level evidence-based approaches. In this article, the authors describe the findings of this multilevel, multicomponent statewide initiative. To date, the Maryland Collaborative has succeeded in providing a forum for colleges to share knowledge and experiences, strengthen existing strategies, and engage in a variety of new activities. Administration of an annual student survey has been useful for guiding interventions as well as evaluating progress toward the Maryland Collaborative’s goal to measurably reduce high-risk drinking and its radiating consequences on student health, safety, and academic performance and on the communities surrounding college campuses. The experiences of the Maryland Collaborative exemplify real-world implementation of evidence-based approaches to reduce this serious public health problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-313
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • college students
  • excessive drinking
  • implementation
  • measurement
  • underage drinking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

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