Addressing alcohol use among primary care patients - Differences between family medicine and internal medicine residents

John B. Schorling, Paul T. Klas, James P. Willems, Anita S. Everett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To determine whether rates of addressing alcohol use differed between family medicine and internal medicine residents, and to determine whether attitudes, confidence, and perceptions affected these relationships. Setting: Two university outpatient clinics, one staffed by family medicine and the other by primary care and categorical internal medicine residents. Design: Cross-sectional study of consecutive patients who had been followed by second- and third-year residents for at least one year. Measurements: Alcohol abuse was determined using the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), with a score a 5 considered positive. Rates of addressing alcohol use in the preceding year were determined by patient report and chart review. Attitudes were assessed using the Substance Abuse Attitude Survey (SAAS). Results: 334 patients of 49 residents completed the MAST. Rates of alcoholism among the patient groups were: family medicine, 8.3%; primary care, 29.1%; and categorical medicine, 18.0% (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-254
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Internal Medicine
Alcoholism
Primary Health Care
Alcohols
Medicine
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Substance-Related Disorders
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • alcoholism
  • family medicine
  • internal medicine
  • residents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Addressing alcohol use among primary care patients - Differences between family medicine and internal medicine residents. / Schorling, John B.; Klas, Paul T.; Willems, James P.; Everett, Anita S.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 5, 05.1994, p. 248-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schorling, John B. ; Klas, Paul T. ; Willems, James P. ; Everett, Anita S. / Addressing alcohol use among primary care patients - Differences between family medicine and internal medicine residents. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 9, No. 5. pp. 248-254.
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