Adaptive behavior change and dementia in down syndrome: Case classification using the adaptive behavior scale

Warren B. Zigman, Nicole Schupf, Tina K. Urv, Wayne Silverman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The history of Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a long and complex one, with the first depictions of individuals with DS noted in artifacts almost 3500 years old. In 1866, John Langdon Down first used the scientifically incorrect and disparaging term "mongols" to describe a collection of symptoms he observed in almost 10% of the children he had treated at the Royal Earlswood Asylum, and in 1959, Lejeune et al. discovered that DS was caused by triplication of the 21st chromosome. DS is the most frequent cause of genetically determined intellectual disability (ID) with a live birth rate of 1 in 733 births.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNeuropsychological Assessments of Dementia in Down Syndrome and Intellectual Disabilities
PublisherSpringer
Pages91-105
Number of pages15
ISBN (Print)9781848002487
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Zigman, W. B., Schupf, N., Urv, T. K., & Silverman, W. (2009). Adaptive behavior change and dementia in down syndrome: Case classification using the adaptive behavior scale. In Neuropsychological Assessments of Dementia in Down Syndrome and Intellectual Disabilities (pp. 91-105). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-249-4_6