Adapting to the global shortage of cholera vaccines: targeted single dose cholera vaccine in response to an outbreak in South Sudan

Lucy A. Parker, John Rumunu, Christine Jamet, Yona Kenyi, Richard Laku Lino, Joseph F. Wamala, Allan M. Mpairwe, Iza Ciglenecki, Francisco J. Luquero, Andrew S. Azman, Jean Clement Cabrol

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Shortages of vaccines for epidemic diseases, such as cholera, meningitis, and yellow fever, have become common over the past decade, hampering efforts to control outbreaks through mass reactive vaccination campaigns. Additionally, various epidemiological, political, and logistical challenges, which are poorly documented in the literature, often lead to delays in reactive campaigns, ultimately reducing the effect of vaccination. In June 2015, a cholera outbreak occurred in Juba, South Sudan, and because of the global shortage of oral cholera vaccine, authorities were unable to secure sufficient doses to vaccinate the entire at-risk population—approximately 1 million people. In this Personal View, we document the first public health use of a reduced, single-dose regimen of oral cholera vaccine, and show the details of the decision-making process and timeline. We also make recommendations to help improve reactive vaccination campaigns against cholera, and discuss the importance of new and flexible context-specific dose regimens and vaccination strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e123-e127
JournalThe Lancet Infectious Diseases
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases

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