Acute Helicobacter pylori infection is followed by an increase in diarrheal disease among Peruvian children.

D. J. Passaro, D. N. Taylor, R. Meza, L. Cabrera, R. H. Gilman, J. Parsonnet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cohort and case-crossover studies were conducted to evaluate whether new Helicobacter pylori infections are followed by increased diarrhea. METHODS: Participants were 6-month-old to 12-year-old shantytown residents living near Lima, Peru. Baseline data were collected from community households. Health interviews were completed daily, and sera, drawn every 4 months, were tested for H pylori immunoglobulin G. Diarrhea rates among newly H pylori-infected (seroconverting) children were compared with rates among persistently uninfected and infected children using cohort and case-crossover analyses. RESULTS: Sera were obtained from 345 children from January 1, 1995, through September 1, 1997. H pylori incidence was 12% per year (36 H pylori infections in 109 866 seronegative days). In adjusted cohort analyses, seroconverters had more diarrhea days (rate ratio: 2.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.6-2.4), episodes, and sick days in the year after infection than did uninfected children; and more diarrhea days and sick days than did persistently infected children. This effect was strongest in the first 2 months. Case-crossover analyses supported these findings. CONCLUSION: Preventing H pylori infection may help reduce pediatric diarrheal disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E87
JournalPediatrics
Volume108
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Acute Helicobacter pylori infection is followed by an increase in diarrheal disease among Peruvian children.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this