Activity status, life satisfaction and perceived productivity for young adults with developmental disabilities

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Abstract

This study analyzed national survey data on young adults with developmental disabilities to describe relationships between activity status and respondents' life satisfaction and self-perceived productivity. Results showed significantly lower life satisfaction ratings for persons who were idle or who only reported housework as an activity compared to respondents engaged in paid employment, schooling, and/or volunteer work. Evidence of positive effects for schooling and volunteer work suggests that efforts to provide training and volunteer placements may be a valuable adjunct to employment-related services in transition programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-13
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation
Volume66
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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