Active-RFID system accuracy and its implications for clinical applications

Duncan Clarke, Adrian Park

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a technology for automatically tracking the location of persons and objects tagged with a small radio transceiver. Its use in retail and security applications has received widespread attention in the popular press. RFID's application in hospital business processes is increasing rapidly, and a number of safety-critical clinical applications have been prototyped. In order to determine RFID's fitness for use in safetycritical as well as more mundane perioperative processes, the Operating Room of the Future project at the University of Maryland Medical Center evaluated six active-RFID systems. The evaluation consisted of hands-on testing of a variety of COTS systems employing the leading active-RFID technologies-802.11 RF, proprietary RF, ultra-wideband, infrared and ultrasound. In this paper we report the results of those tests and discuss their implications for the application of active-RFID technology to clinical applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - 19th IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2006
Pages21-26
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 22 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event19th IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2006 - Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Duration: Jun 22 2006Jun 23 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings - IEEE Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems
Volume2006
ISSN (Print)1063-7125

Other

Other19th IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems, CBMS 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySalt Lake City, UT
Period6/22/066/23/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Computer Science Applications

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