Active and passive cigarette smoking and mortality among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer

Stephanie D. Boone, Kathy B. Baumgartner, Richard N. Baumgartner, Avonne E. Connor, Esther M. John, Anna R. Giuliano, Lisa M. Hines, Shesh N. Rai, Elizabeth C. Riley, Christina M. Pinkston, Roger K. Wolff, Martha L. Slattery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Women who smoke at breast cancer diagnosis have higher risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality than nonsmokers; however, differences by ethnicity or prognostic factors and risk for noncancer mortality have not been evaluated. Methods: We examined associations of active and passive smoke exposure with mortality among Hispanic (n = 1020) and non-Hispanic white (n = 1198) women with invasive breast cancer in the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study (median follow-up of 10.6 years). Results: Risk of breast cancer-specific (HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.11-2.16) and all-cause (HR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.30-2.17) mortality was increased for current smokers, with similar results stratified by ethnicity. Ever smokers had an increased risk of noncancer mortality (HR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.12-2.51). Associations were strongest for current smokers who smoked for 20 years or more were postmenopausal, overweight and/or obese, or reported moderate and/or high alcohol consumption; however, interactions were not significant. Breast cancer-specific mortality was increased two fold for moderate and/or high recent passive smoke exposure among never smokers (HR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.24-3.63). Conclusions: Findings support associations of active-smoking and passive-smoking diagnosis with risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality and ever smoking with noncancer mortality, regardless of ethnicity, and other factors. Smoking is a modifiable lifestyle factor and effective smoking cessation, and maintenance programs should be routinely recommended for women with breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)824-831
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of epidemiology
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2015

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Ethnicity
  • Hispanic
  • Mortality
  • Native American ancestry
  • Smoking
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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