Activation of divergent neuronal cell death pathways in different target cell populations during neuroadapted Sindbis virus infection of mice

Michael B. Havert, Brian Schofield, Diane Griffin, David N. Irani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Infection of adult mice with neuroadapted Sindbis virus (NSV) results in a severe encephalomyelitis accompanied by prominent hindlimb paralysis. We find that the onset of paralysis parallels morphologic changes in motor neuron cell bodies in the lumbar spinal cord and in motor neuron axons in ventral nerve roots, many of which are eventually lost over time. However, unlike NSV-induced neuronal cell death found in the brain of infected animals, the loss of motor neurons does not appear to be apoptotic, as judged by morphologic and biochemical criteria. This may be explained in part by the lack of detectable caspase-3 expression in these cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5352-5356
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume74
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Sindbis virus
Sindbis Virus
Health Services Needs and Demand
Motor Neurons
Virus Diseases
motor neurons
cell death
Cell Death
neurons
paralysis
Paralysis
Spinal Cord
mice
infection
Encephalomyelitis
Spinal Nerve Roots
cells
caspase-3
Hindlimb
encephalitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Activation of divergent neuronal cell death pathways in different target cell populations during neuroadapted Sindbis virus infection of mice. / Havert, Michael B.; Schofield, Brian; Griffin, Diane; Irani, David N.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 74, No. 11, 2000, p. 5352-5356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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