Activation of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus expression during maturation of monocytes to macrophages

O. Narayan, S. Kennedy-Stoskopf, D. Sheffer, Diane Griffin, Janice E Clements

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lentiviruses, which cause arthritis-encephalitis and maedi-visna in goats and sheep, respectively, cause persistent infections in these animals. The viruses replicate productively at low levels in macrophages in diseased organs such as the 'maedi lung' and nonproductively in other cell types such as leukocytes in peripheral blood. Nonproductive infections become productive during in vitro cultivation of the cells. This study showed that monocytes were the only cells in the peripheral blood leukocytes of an infected animal in which virus was detected and that virus activation occurred only when these cells matured into macrophages. Only a minute fraction of cultured monocytes matured into macrophages, and viral infectivity was associated exclusively with this fraction. Antiglobulin-coated glass wool fragments were lethal for monocyte macrophages because of toxic phagocytosis, but had no effect on B or T lymphocytes. The simultaneous addition of the glass fragments and leukocytes to culture dishes resulted in no macrophage maturation and no virus production. The addition of the fragments to virus-producing macrophages caused the death of the cells and a decline in virus production. Virus production in less avidly phagocytic cells was unaffected by the glass. Thus, although macrophages may be permissive for virus replication, one mechanism for restricted virus expression in vivo may be physiological factors controlling the maturation of these cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-73
Number of pages7
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume41
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Viruses
Monocytes
Macrophages
Viruses
Progressive Interstitial Pneumonia of Sheep
Glass
Leukocytes
Visna
Virus Activation
Lentivirus
Wool
Poisons
Encephalitis
Phagocytes
Virus Replication
Infection
Phagocytosis
Goats
Arthritis
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Activation of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus expression during maturation of monocytes to macrophages. / Narayan, O.; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S.; Sheffer, D.; Griffin, Diane; Clements, Janice E.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 41, No. 1, 1983, p. 67-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{47f2937c46b843dbb52753aa1e32c2bc,
title = "Activation of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus expression during maturation of monocytes to macrophages",
abstract = "Lentiviruses, which cause arthritis-encephalitis and maedi-visna in goats and sheep, respectively, cause persistent infections in these animals. The viruses replicate productively at low levels in macrophages in diseased organs such as the 'maedi lung' and nonproductively in other cell types such as leukocytes in peripheral blood. Nonproductive infections become productive during in vitro cultivation of the cells. This study showed that monocytes were the only cells in the peripheral blood leukocytes of an infected animal in which virus was detected and that virus activation occurred only when these cells matured into macrophages. Only a minute fraction of cultured monocytes matured into macrophages, and viral infectivity was associated exclusively with this fraction. Antiglobulin-coated glass wool fragments were lethal for monocyte macrophages because of toxic phagocytosis, but had no effect on B or T lymphocytes. The simultaneous addition of the glass fragments and leukocytes to culture dishes resulted in no macrophage maturation and no virus production. The addition of the fragments to virus-producing macrophages caused the death of the cells and a decline in virus production. Virus production in less avidly phagocytic cells was unaffected by the glass. Thus, although macrophages may be permissive for virus replication, one mechanism for restricted virus expression in vivo may be physiological factors controlling the maturation of these cells.",
author = "O. Narayan and S. Kennedy-Stoskopf and D. Sheffer and Diane Griffin and Clements, {Janice E}",
year = "1983",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "67--73",
journal = "Infection and Immunity",
issn = "0019-9567",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Activation of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus expression during maturation of monocytes to macrophages

AU - Narayan, O.

AU - Kennedy-Stoskopf, S.

AU - Sheffer, D.

AU - Griffin, Diane

AU - Clements, Janice E

PY - 1983

Y1 - 1983

N2 - Lentiviruses, which cause arthritis-encephalitis and maedi-visna in goats and sheep, respectively, cause persistent infections in these animals. The viruses replicate productively at low levels in macrophages in diseased organs such as the 'maedi lung' and nonproductively in other cell types such as leukocytes in peripheral blood. Nonproductive infections become productive during in vitro cultivation of the cells. This study showed that monocytes were the only cells in the peripheral blood leukocytes of an infected animal in which virus was detected and that virus activation occurred only when these cells matured into macrophages. Only a minute fraction of cultured monocytes matured into macrophages, and viral infectivity was associated exclusively with this fraction. Antiglobulin-coated glass wool fragments were lethal for monocyte macrophages because of toxic phagocytosis, but had no effect on B or T lymphocytes. The simultaneous addition of the glass fragments and leukocytes to culture dishes resulted in no macrophage maturation and no virus production. The addition of the fragments to virus-producing macrophages caused the death of the cells and a decline in virus production. Virus production in less avidly phagocytic cells was unaffected by the glass. Thus, although macrophages may be permissive for virus replication, one mechanism for restricted virus expression in vivo may be physiological factors controlling the maturation of these cells.

AB - Lentiviruses, which cause arthritis-encephalitis and maedi-visna in goats and sheep, respectively, cause persistent infections in these animals. The viruses replicate productively at low levels in macrophages in diseased organs such as the 'maedi lung' and nonproductively in other cell types such as leukocytes in peripheral blood. Nonproductive infections become productive during in vitro cultivation of the cells. This study showed that monocytes were the only cells in the peripheral blood leukocytes of an infected animal in which virus was detected and that virus activation occurred only when these cells matured into macrophages. Only a minute fraction of cultured monocytes matured into macrophages, and viral infectivity was associated exclusively with this fraction. Antiglobulin-coated glass wool fragments were lethal for monocyte macrophages because of toxic phagocytosis, but had no effect on B or T lymphocytes. The simultaneous addition of the glass fragments and leukocytes to culture dishes resulted in no macrophage maturation and no virus production. The addition of the fragments to virus-producing macrophages caused the death of the cells and a decline in virus production. Virus production in less avidly phagocytic cells was unaffected by the glass. Thus, although macrophages may be permissive for virus replication, one mechanism for restricted virus expression in vivo may be physiological factors controlling the maturation of these cells.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0020615078&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0020615078&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6862634

AN - SCOPUS:0020615078

VL - 41

SP - 67

EP - 73

JO - Infection and Immunity

JF - Infection and Immunity

SN - 0019-9567

IS - 1

ER -