Acquisition of new sexual partners among women with HIV infection

Patterns of disclosure and sexual behavior within new partnerships

Tracey E. Wilson, Joseph Feldman, Miriam Y. Vega, Monica Gandhi, Jean Richardson, Mardge H. Cohen, Rosemary McKaig, David Ostrow, Esther Robison, Stephen J Gange

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study describes the sexual behavior of HIV-positive women within new versus more established relationships and determines whether beliefs about HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) impact these behaviors. The Women's Interagency HIV Study is a longitudinal cohort study of HIV among women in the United States. Sexually active HIV-positive women (N = 1,090) completed interviews on beliefs and behaviors at 6-month intervals. Data were analyzed for the period between April 2002 and March 2003. Of 1,517 sexual partners reported, 32% were newly acquired within the previous 6 months. As compared with more established sexual relationships, newer partnerships were characterized by greater condom use consistency (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval = 1.4 -2.3). Holding beliefs that ART is protective for HIV transmission impacted the relationship between partner type and condom use. In established relationships, 63% reported consistent condom use if they believed that ART is not protective, whereas 54% reported consistent condom use if they believed that ART is protective. Conclusions: These findings highlight the importance of ongoing support for sexual risk reduction among women with HIV-infection and for strategies that reduce the strength of relationships between ART beliefs and sexual risk behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-159
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Education and Prevention
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

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Sexual Partners
Disclosure
Sexual Behavior
HIV Infections
Condoms
HIV
partner relationship
risk behavior
Behavior Therapy
Risk Reduction Behavior
Therapeutics
Risk-Taking
confidence
Longitudinal Studies
Cohort Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Interviews
interview

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

Acquisition of new sexual partners among women with HIV infection : Patterns of disclosure and sexual behavior within new partnerships. / Wilson, Tracey E.; Feldman, Joseph; Vega, Miriam Y.; Gandhi, Monica; Richardson, Jean; Cohen, Mardge H.; McKaig, Rosemary; Ostrow, David; Robison, Esther; Gange, Stephen J.

In: AIDS Education and Prevention, Vol. 19, No. 2, 04.2007, p. 151-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, TE, Feldman, J, Vega, MY, Gandhi, M, Richardson, J, Cohen, MH, McKaig, R, Ostrow, D, Robison, E & Gange, SJ 2007, 'Acquisition of new sexual partners among women with HIV infection: Patterns of disclosure and sexual behavior within new partnerships', AIDS Education and Prevention, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 151-159. https://doi.org/10.1521/aeap.2007.19.2.151
Wilson, Tracey E. ; Feldman, Joseph ; Vega, Miriam Y. ; Gandhi, Monica ; Richardson, Jean ; Cohen, Mardge H. ; McKaig, Rosemary ; Ostrow, David ; Robison, Esther ; Gange, Stephen J. / Acquisition of new sexual partners among women with HIV infection : Patterns of disclosure and sexual behavior within new partnerships. In: AIDS Education and Prevention. 2007 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 151-159.
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