Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings in the brain.

J. Balakrishnan, P. S. Becker, A. J. Kumar, S. J. Zinreich, J. C. McArthur, R. N. Bryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The appearance on magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomographic (CT) images of specific central nervous system disorders associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in 12 cases was correlated with autopsy findings. There were three cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy; three, primary lymphoma; three, toxoplasmosis; one, cryptococcosis; one, cytomegalovirus infection; and one, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. MR imaging demonstrated the various cranial lesions more clearly than did CT. On the basis of MR imaging characteristics, HIV encephalopathy could be distinguished from other lesions, particularly progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Basal ganglia were the most common sites of involvement in opportunistic infections and primary lymphoma. Reliable distinguishing features among lesions of the basal ganglia were not found, except for cryptococcal lesions, which had a unique appearance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-215
Number of pages15
JournalRadiographics : a review publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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