Acquired epileptic aphasia. Diagnostic aspects of progressive language loss in preschool children

M. Msall, Bruce K Shapiro, P. B. Balfour, E. Niedermeyer, A. J. Capute

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Abstract

A case of acquired epileptic aphasia presenting as language delay and hyperactivity is presented and clinical aspects reviewed. Acquired epileptic aphasia is a diffuse neurologic process of unknown etiology that presents in preschool children. Although progressive language loss and seizures are the major manifestations, deficits in attention and socialization may be noted. The electroencephalogram is usually diagnostic. While almost all (80%) children develop seizures, approximately half present as language delay without seizures. Recognition of the progressive and global nature of the language dysfunction may permit earlier diagnosis and intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-251
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume25
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1986

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Msall, M., Shapiro, B. K., Balfour, P. B., Niedermeyer, E., & Capute, A. J. (1986). Acquired epileptic aphasia. Diagnostic aspects of progressive language loss in preschool children. Clinical Pediatrics, 25(5), 248-251.