ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2), COVID-19, and ACE inhibitor and ang II (angiotensin II) receptor blocker use during the pandemic: The pediatric perspective

Andrew M. South, Tammy McLoughlin Brady, Andrew M. South, Andrew M. South, Tammy M. Brady, Joseph T. Flynn

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Potential but unconfirmed risk factors for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in adults and children may include hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease, as well as the medications commonly prescribed for these conditions, ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors, and Ang II (angiotensin II) receptor blockers. Coronavirus binding to ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2), a crucial component of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, underlies much of this concern. Children are uniquely impacted by the coronavirus, but the reasons are unclear. This review will highlight the relationship of COVID-19 with hypertension, use of ACE inhibitors and Ang II receptor blockers, and lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease from the pediatric perspective. We briefly summarize the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and comprehensively review the literature pertaining to the ACE 2/Ang-(1-7) pathway in children and the clinical evidence for how ACE inhibitors and Ang II receptor blockers affect this important pathway. Given the importance of the ACE 2/Ang-(1-7) pathway and the potential differences between adults and children, it is crucial that children are included in coronavirus-related research, as this may shed light on potential mechanisms for why children are at decreased risk of severe COVID-19.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-22
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2), COVID-19, and ACE inhibitor and ang II (angiotensin II) receptor blocker use during the pandemic: The pediatric perspective'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this