Acculturation is associated with left ventricular mass in a multiethnic sample

The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Valery S. Effoe, Haiying Chen, Andrew Moran, Alain G. Bertoni, David A. Bluemke, Teresa Seeman, Christine Darwin, Karol E. Watson, Carlos J. Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Acculturation involves stress-related processes and health behavioral changes, which may have an effect on left ventricular (LV) mass, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined the relationship between acculturation and LV mass in a multiethnic cohort of White, African-American, Hispanic and Chinese subjects. Methods: Cardiac magnetic resonance assessment was available for 5004 men and women, free of clinical CVD at baseline. Left ventricular mass index was evaluated as LV mass indexed by body surface area. Acculturation was characterized based on language spoken at home, place of birth and length of stay in the United States (U.S.), and a summary acculturation score ranging from 0=least acculturated to 5=most acculturated. Mean LV mass index adjusted for traditional CVD risk factors was compared across acculturation levels. Results: Unadjusted mean LV mass index was 78.0±16.3 g/m2. In adjusted analyses, speaking exclusively English at home compared to non-English language was associated with higher LV mass index (81.3±0.4 g/m2 vs 79.9±0.5 g/m2, p=0.02). Among foreign-born participants, having lived in the U.S. for≥20 years compared to2 vs 79.5±1.1 g/m2, p=0.02). Compared to those with the lowest acculturation score, those with the highest score had greater LV mass index (78.9±1.1 g/m2 vs 81.1±0.4 g/m2, p=0.002). There was heterogeneity in which measure of acculturation was associated with LV mass index across ethnic groups. Conclusions: Greater acculturation is associated with increased LV mass index in this multiethnic cohort. Acculturation may involve stress-related processes as well as behavioral changes with a negative effect on cardiovascular health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number161
JournalBMC Cardiovascular Disorders
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 3 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Acculturation
Atherosclerosis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Language
Body Surface Area
Health
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
African Americans
Length of Stay
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Cardiovascular risk
  • Ethnic disparities
  • Left ventricular mass index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Acculturation is associated with left ventricular mass in a multiethnic sample : The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. / Effoe, Valery S.; Chen, Haiying; Moran, Andrew; Bertoni, Alain G.; Bluemke, David A.; Seeman, Teresa; Darwin, Christine; Watson, Karol E.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.

In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, Vol. 15, No. 1, 161, 03.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Effoe, VS, Chen, H, Moran, A, Bertoni, AG, Bluemke, DA, Seeman, T, Darwin, C, Watson, KE & Rodriguez, CJ 2015, 'Acculturation is associated with left ventricular mass in a multiethnic sample: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis', BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, vol. 15, no. 1, 161. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12872-015-0157-3
Effoe, Valery S. ; Chen, Haiying ; Moran, Andrew ; Bertoni, Alain G. ; Bluemke, David A. ; Seeman, Teresa ; Darwin, Christine ; Watson, Karol E. ; Rodriguez, Carlos J. / Acculturation is associated with left ventricular mass in a multiethnic sample : The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders. 2015 ; Vol. 15, No. 1.
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T2 - The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

AU - Effoe, Valery S.

AU - Chen, Haiying

AU - Moran, Andrew

AU - Bertoni, Alain G.

AU - Bluemke, David A.

AU - Seeman, Teresa

AU - Darwin, Christine

AU - Watson, Karol E.

AU - Rodriguez, Carlos J.

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N2 - Background: Acculturation involves stress-related processes and health behavioral changes, which may have an effect on left ventricular (LV) mass, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined the relationship between acculturation and LV mass in a multiethnic cohort of White, African-American, Hispanic and Chinese subjects. Methods: Cardiac magnetic resonance assessment was available for 5004 men and women, free of clinical CVD at baseline. Left ventricular mass index was evaluated as LV mass indexed by body surface area. Acculturation was characterized based on language spoken at home, place of birth and length of stay in the United States (U.S.), and a summary acculturation score ranging from 0=least acculturated to 5=most acculturated. Mean LV mass index adjusted for traditional CVD risk factors was compared across acculturation levels. Results: Unadjusted mean LV mass index was 78.0±16.3 g/m2. In adjusted analyses, speaking exclusively English at home compared to non-English language was associated with higher LV mass index (81.3±0.4 g/m2 vs 79.9±0.5 g/m2, p=0.02). Among foreign-born participants, having lived in the U.S. for≥20 years compared to2 vs 79.5±1.1 g/m2, p=0.02). Compared to those with the lowest acculturation score, those with the highest score had greater LV mass index (78.9±1.1 g/m2 vs 81.1±0.4 g/m2, p=0.002). There was heterogeneity in which measure of acculturation was associated with LV mass index across ethnic groups. Conclusions: Greater acculturation is associated with increased LV mass index in this multiethnic cohort. Acculturation may involve stress-related processes as well as behavioral changes with a negative effect on cardiovascular health.

AB - Background: Acculturation involves stress-related processes and health behavioral changes, which may have an effect on left ventricular (LV) mass, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined the relationship between acculturation and LV mass in a multiethnic cohort of White, African-American, Hispanic and Chinese subjects. Methods: Cardiac magnetic resonance assessment was available for 5004 men and women, free of clinical CVD at baseline. Left ventricular mass index was evaluated as LV mass indexed by body surface area. Acculturation was characterized based on language spoken at home, place of birth and length of stay in the United States (U.S.), and a summary acculturation score ranging from 0=least acculturated to 5=most acculturated. Mean LV mass index adjusted for traditional CVD risk factors was compared across acculturation levels. Results: Unadjusted mean LV mass index was 78.0±16.3 g/m2. In adjusted analyses, speaking exclusively English at home compared to non-English language was associated with higher LV mass index (81.3±0.4 g/m2 vs 79.9±0.5 g/m2, p=0.02). Among foreign-born participants, having lived in the U.S. for≥20 years compared to2 vs 79.5±1.1 g/m2, p=0.02). Compared to those with the lowest acculturation score, those with the highest score had greater LV mass index (78.9±1.1 g/m2 vs 81.1±0.4 g/m2, p=0.002). There was heterogeneity in which measure of acculturation was associated with LV mass index across ethnic groups. Conclusions: Greater acculturation is associated with increased LV mass index in this multiethnic cohort. Acculturation may involve stress-related processes as well as behavioral changes with a negative effect on cardiovascular health.

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KW - Ethnic disparities

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