Acculturation and cigarette smoking among Korean American men

Hee Soon Juon, Miyong Kim, Haera Han, Jai P. Ryu, Wolmi Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the prevalence and correlated factors of cigarette smoking in a cross-sectional, epidemiological survey of Korean American men living in Maryland (n=333). In this sample, 26.1% were current smokers and 42.3% were former smokers. The older age group (≥ 40 years) was more likely to have quit smoking than the younger age group (< 40 years). In multiple logistic regression analysis, acculturation was associated with smoking status; those who stayed more than 20 years in the U.S. were less likely to be current smokers (OR=0.32, 95% CI 0.13-0.77) than those who stayed less than 10 years. Alcohol use was associated with smoking status; those who consumed alcohol were more likely to be current smokers (OR=5.24, 95% CI 2.33-11.79) or former smokers (OR=5.45, 95% CI=2.69-11.04) than those did not. Those with hypertension were more likely to have quit smoking (OR=3.11, 95% CI=1.33-7.24). The results suggest that the role of acculturation in smoking status among Korean American men deserves further attention by researchers as well as by health professionals who develop smoking prevention and cessation programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)875-882
Number of pages8
JournalYonsei Medical Journal
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 30 2003

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Alcohol use
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Korean-American men

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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