Acculturation and cancer screening among Asian Americans: Role of health insurance and having a regular physician

Sunmin Lee, Lu Chen, Mary Y. Jung, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati, Hee Soon Juon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cancer is the leading cause of death among Asian Americans, but screening rates are significantly lower in Asians than in non-Hispanic Whites. This study examined associations between acculturation and three types of cancer screening (colorectal, cervical, and breast), focusing on the role of health insurance and having a regular physician. A cross-sectional study of 851 Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese Americans was conducted in Maryland. Acculturation was measured using an abridged version of the Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Acculturation Scale, acculturation clusters, language preference, length of residency in the US, and age at arrival. Age, health insurance, regular physician, gender, ethnicity, income, marital status, and health status were adjusted in the multivariate analysis. Logistic regression analysis showed that various measures of acculturation were positively associated with the odds of having all cancer screenings. Those lived for more than 20 years in the US were about 2-4 times [odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) colorectal: 2.41 (1.52-3.82); cervical: 1.79 (1.07-3.01); and breast: 2.11 (1.25-3.57)] more likely than those who lived for less than 10 years to have had cancer screening. When health insurance and having a regular physician were adjusted, the associations between length of residency and colorectal cancer [OR 1.72 (1.05-2.81)] was reduced and the association between length of residency and cervical and breast cancer became no longer significant. Findings from this study provide a robust and comprehensive picture of AA cancer screening behavior. They will provide helpful information on future target groups for promoting cancer screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-212
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Asian Americans
Health Insurance
acculturation
Early Detection of Cancer
health insurance
cancer
physician
Physicians
Internship and Residency
Breast
Odds Ratio
Marital Status
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Health Status
Cause of Death
Colorectal Neoplasms
Language
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Asian Americans
  • Breast neoplasms/prevention and control
  • Colorectal neoplasms/prevention and control
  • Early detection of cancer
  • Uterine cervical neoplasms/prevention and control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Acculturation and cancer screening among Asian Americans : Role of health insurance and having a regular physician. / Lee, Sunmin; Chen, Lu; Jung, Mary Y.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Juon, Hee Soon.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 39, No. 2, 2014, p. 201-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Sunmin ; Chen, Lu ; Jung, Mary Y. ; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes ; Juon, Hee Soon. / Acculturation and cancer screening among Asian Americans : Role of health insurance and having a regular physician. In: Journal of Community Health. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 201-212.
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