Access to and experiences with, e-health technology among glaucoma patients and their relationship with medication adherence

Paula Anne Newman-Casey, Olivia J. Killeen, Morgan Renner, Alan L. Robin, Paul Lee, Michele Heisler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: As online health information becomes common, it is important to assess patients' access to and experiences with online resources. Introduction: We examined whether glaucoma patients' technology usage differs by medication adherence and whether adherence is associated with online education experiences. Materials and Methods: We included 164 adults with glaucoma taking ≥1 glaucoma medication. Participants completed a survey including demographic and health information, the Morisky Adherence Scale, and questions about online glaucoma resource usage. Differences in technology access, adherence, and age were compared with chi-squared, Fisher exact, and two-sample t-tests. Results: Mean age was 66 years. Twenty-six percent reported poor adherence. Eighty percent had good technology access. Seventy-three percent of subjects with greater technology access wanted online glaucoma information and yet only 14% of patients had been directed to online resources by physicians. There was no relationship between technological connectivity and adherence (p = 0.51). Nonadherent patients were younger (mean age 58 years vs. 66 years for adherent patients, p = 0.002). Nonadherence was associated with negative feelings about online searches (68% vs. 42%, p = 0.06). Discussion: Younger, poorly adherent patients navigate online glaucoma resources without physician input. These online searches are often unsatisfying. Technology should be leveraged to create high quality, online glaucoma resources that physicians can recommend to provide guidance for disease self-management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1026-1035
Number of pages10
JournalTelemedicine and e-Health
Volume24
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Biomedical Technology
Medication Adherence
Glaucoma
Technology
Physicians
Self Care
Disease Management
Emotions
Demography
Education
Health

Keywords

  • E-health
  • Education
  • Glaucoma
  • Medication adherence
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Access to and experiences with, e-health technology among glaucoma patients and their relationship with medication adherence. / Newman-Casey, Paula Anne; Killeen, Olivia J.; Renner, Morgan; Robin, Alan L.; Lee, Paul; Heisler, Michele.

In: Telemedicine and e-Health, Vol. 24, No. 12, 01.12.2018, p. 1026-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Newman-Casey, Paula Anne ; Killeen, Olivia J. ; Renner, Morgan ; Robin, Alan L. ; Lee, Paul ; Heisler, Michele. / Access to and experiences with, e-health technology among glaucoma patients and their relationship with medication adherence. In: Telemedicine and e-Health. 2018 ; Vol. 24, No. 12. pp. 1026-1035.
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