Acceptability of mobile phone-based nurse-delivered counseling intervention to improve HIV treatment adherence and self-care behaviors among HIV-positive women in India

Mona Duggal, Venkatesan Chakrapani, Lauren Liberti, Veena Satyanarayna, Meiya Varghese, Pushpendera Singh, Mohini Ranganathan, Prabha Chandra, Nancy R. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We assessed the acceptability of nurse-delivered mobile phone-based counseling to support adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) and self-care behaviors among HIV-positive women in India. We conducted open-ended, in-depth interviews with 27 HIV-positive women and 19 key informants at a government ART center in Karnataka, India. Data were analyzed with interpretive techniques. About half of the HIV-positive women owned a mobile phone and many had access to mobile phones of their family members. Most women perceived phone-based counseling as a personalized care approach to get information on demand. Also, women felt that they could discuss mental health issues and ask sensitive information that they would hesitate to discuss face-to-face. Findings indicate that, when compared with text messaging, mobile phone-based counseling could be a more acceptable way to engage with women on ART, especially those with limited literacy. Future studies should focus on testing mobile phone-based information/counseling and adherence interventions that take the local context into account.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-359
Number of pages11
JournalAIDS patient care and STDs
Volume32
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

Keywords

  • HIV-positive women
  • India
  • antiretroviral treatment adherence
  • counseling
  • mobile phones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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