Acceptability of a computerized brief intervention for alcohol among abstinent but at-risk pregnant women

Sarah A. Pollick, Jessica R. Beatty, Robert J. Sokol, Ronald C. Strickler, Grace Chang, Dace S. Svikis, Golfo K. Tzilos, Steven J. Ondersma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Limitations in time and training have hindered widespread implementation of alcohol-based interventions in prenatal clinics. Also, despite the possibility of underreporting or relapse, many at-risk women report that they quit drinking after pregnancy confirmation so that interventions focusing on current drinking may seem unnecessary. The Computerized Brief Intervention for Alcohol Use in Pregnancy (C-BIAP) was designed to (a) be implemented via a handheld device in prenatal clinics, and (b) use a modified brief intervention strategy with women who screen at-risk but report no current drinking. Methods: The authors administered the C-BIAP to 18 T-ACE (Tolerance, Annoyance, Cut Down, and Eye Opener)-positive pregnant African American women who provided quantitative and qualitative feedback. Results: The C-BIAP received high ratings of acceptability; qualitative feedback was also positive overall and suggested good acceptance of abstinence themes. Conclusions: Technology may be a feasible and acceptable method for brief intervention delivery with pregnant women who do not report current drinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-20
Number of pages8
JournalSubstance Abuse
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2015

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Alcohol/alcoholism
  • intervention programs
  • mixed-methods research
  • pregnancy
  • technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Pollick, S. A., Beatty, J. R., Sokol, R. J., Strickler, R. C., Chang, G., Svikis, D. S., Tzilos, G. K., & Ondersma, S. J. (2015). Acceptability of a computerized brief intervention for alcohol among abstinent but at-risk pregnant women. Substance Abuse, 36(1), 13-20. https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2013.857631