Acceptability and preliminary outcomes of a peer-led depression prevention intervention for African American adolescents and young adults in employment training programs

Darius Tandon, Tamar Mendelson, Gishawn Mance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the acceptability and preliminary outcomes from an open trial of a depression prevention intervention for low-income African American adolescents and young adults in employment training programs. The sample (N=42) consisted of predominately African American adolescents and young adults (mean age=19.1) exhibiting subclinical depressive symptoms. A 9-week intervention incorporating cognitive-behavioral therapy and a focus on coping with stressful and traumatic events was delivered by young adult employment training program graduates. Data on attendance, participant ratings of intervention sessions, and fidelity of implementation indicated good intervention acceptability. Statistically significant differences were found when comparing changes in high- and low-intervention dosage participants' depressive symptoms and active coping strategies from pre- to post-intervention, although there were no significant differences for the other three coping domains. These findings suggest that depression prevention interventions in employment training programs should be further examined using more rigorous research designs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)621-628
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of community psychology
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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