Acanthamoeba interactions with human brain microvascular endothelial cells

Selwa Alsam, Kwang Sik Kim, Monique Stins, Antonio Ortega Rivas, James Sissons, Naveed Ahmed Khan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Acanthamoeba are opportunistic protozoan parasites that can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis, however, the pathogenic mechanisms associated with this disease remain unclear. One of the primary factors in Acanthamoeba encephalitis is the haematogenous spread, followed by invasion of the blood-brain barrier resulting in the transmigration of Acanthamoeba into the central nervous system. In this study, we have used human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier and studied their interactions with Acanthamoeba. Using in vitro cultures, we showed that Acanthamoeba isolates belonging to genotypes T3, T4 and T11, exhibited increased cytotoxicity on human brain microvascular endothelial cells as well as exhibited higher binding and were considered potential pathogens. In contrast, Acanthamoeba isolates belonging to genotypes T2 and T7 exhibited minimal cytotoxicity and significantly less binding to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-241
Number of pages7
JournalMicrobial Pathogenesis
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003

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Acanthamoeba
Endothelial Cells
Brain
Encephalitis
Blood-Brain Barrier
Genotype
Parasites
Central Nervous System

Keywords

  • Acanthamoeba
  • Adhesion
  • Cytotoxicity
  • Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis
  • Mannose-binding protein
  • Pathogenic protozoa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Acanthamoeba interactions with human brain microvascular endothelial cells. / Alsam, Selwa; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Rivas, Antonio Ortega; Sissons, James; Khan, Naveed Ahmed.

In: Microbial Pathogenesis, Vol. 35, No. 6, 12.2003, p. 235-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alsam, Selwa ; Kim, Kwang Sik ; Stins, Monique ; Rivas, Antonio Ortega ; Sissons, James ; Khan, Naveed Ahmed. / Acanthamoeba interactions with human brain microvascular endothelial cells. In: Microbial Pathogenesis. 2003 ; Vol. 35, No. 6. pp. 235-241.
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