Abnormal T-cell subset proportions in vitamin-A-deficient children

Richard David Semba, Keith West, Ph, Alfred Sommer, Diane Griffin, B. J. Ward, D. E. Griffin, R. D. Semba, Alan Leroy Scott, Muhilal, G. Natadisastra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although vitamin A deficiency in children seems to increase susceptibility to infection and community trials have shown that vitamin A supplementation can reduce childhood mortality from infectious diseases, the underlying biological mechanisms are largely unknown. We conducted a randomised, double-masked, placebo-controlled clinical trial among children in West Java, Indonesia, to determine whether vitamin A deficiency is associated with abnormalities in T-cell subsets and whether vitamin A supplementation affects T-cell subsets. We studied 55 children aged 3-6 years-30 with xerophthalmia and 25 without. Acutely malnourished children (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-8
Number of pages4
JournalThe Lancet
Volume341
Issue number8836
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 1993

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T-Lymphocyte Subsets
Vitamin A
Vitamin A Deficiency
Xerophthalmia
Indonesia
Controlled Clinical Trials
Communicable Diseases
Placebos
Mortality
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Abnormal T-cell subset proportions in vitamin-A-deficient children. / Semba, Richard David; West, Keith; Ph, ; Sommer, Alfred; Griffin, Diane; Ward, B. J.; Griffin, D. E.; Semba, R. D.; Scott, Alan Leroy; Muhilal; Natadisastra, G.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 341, No. 8836, 02.01.1993, p. 5-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Semba, Richard David ; West, Keith ; Ph, ; Sommer, Alfred ; Griffin, Diane ; Ward, B. J. ; Griffin, D. E. ; Semba, R. D. ; Scott, Alan Leroy ; Muhilal ; Natadisastra, G. / Abnormal T-cell subset proportions in vitamin-A-deficient children. In: The Lancet. 1993 ; Vol. 341, No. 8836. pp. 5-8.
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