Abnormal attention modulation of fear circuit function in pediatric generalized anxiety disorder

Erin B. McClure, Christopher S. Monk, Eric E. Nelson, Jessica M. Parrish, Abby Adler, R. James R Blair, Stephen Fromm, Dennis S. Charney, Ellen Leibenluft, Monique Ernst, Daniel S. Pine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: Considerable work implicates abnormal neural activation and disrupted attention to facial-threat cues in adult anxiety disorders. However, in pediatric anxiety, no research has examined attention modulation of neural response to threat cues. Objective: To determine whether attention modulates amygdala and cortical responses to facial-threat cues differentially in adolescents with generalized anxiety disorder and in healthy adolescents. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Government clinical research institute. Participants: Fifteen adolescents with generalized anxiety disorder and 20 controls. Main Outcome Measures: Blood oxygenation level-dependent signal as measured via functional magnetic resonance imaging. During imaging, participants completed a face-emotion rating task that systematically manipulated attention. Results: While attending to their own subjective fear, patients, but not controls, showed greater activation to fearful faces than to happy faces in a distributed network including the amygdala, ventral prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-106
Number of pages10
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Anxiety Disorders
Fear
Pediatrics
Cues
Gyrus Cinguli
Amygdala
Prefrontal Cortex
Case-Control Studies
Emotions
Anxiety
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

McClure, E. B., Monk, C. S., Nelson, E. E., Parrish, J. M., Adler, A., Blair, R. J. R., ... Pine, D. S. (2007). Abnormal attention modulation of fear circuit function in pediatric generalized anxiety disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry, 64(1), 97-106. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.64.1.97

Abnormal attention modulation of fear circuit function in pediatric generalized anxiety disorder. / McClure, Erin B.; Monk, Christopher S.; Nelson, Eric E.; Parrish, Jessica M.; Adler, Abby; Blair, R. James R; Fromm, Stephen; Charney, Dennis S.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Ernst, Monique; Pine, Daniel S.

In: Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 64, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 97-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McClure, EB, Monk, CS, Nelson, EE, Parrish, JM, Adler, A, Blair, RJR, Fromm, S, Charney, DS, Leibenluft, E, Ernst, M & Pine, DS 2007, 'Abnormal attention modulation of fear circuit function in pediatric generalized anxiety disorder', Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 97-106. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.64.1.97
McClure, Erin B. ; Monk, Christopher S. ; Nelson, Eric E. ; Parrish, Jessica M. ; Adler, Abby ; Blair, R. James R ; Fromm, Stephen ; Charney, Dennis S. ; Leibenluft, Ellen ; Ernst, Monique ; Pine, Daniel S. / Abnormal attention modulation of fear circuit function in pediatric generalized anxiety disorder. In: Archives of General Psychiatry. 2007 ; Vol. 64, No. 1. pp. 97-106.
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