Ability of Exercise Testing to Predict Cardiovascular and All-Cause Death in Asymptomatic Women: A 20-Year Follow-up of the Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence Study

Samia Mora, Rita F. Redberg, Yadong Cui, Maura K. Whiteman, Jodi A. Flaws, A. Richey Sharrett, Roger S Blumenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: The value of exercise testing in women has been questioned. Objective: To determine the prognostic value of exercise testing in a population-based cohort of asymptomatic women followed up for 20 years. Design and Setting: Near-maximal Bruce-protocol treadmill test data from the Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence Study (1972-1976) with follow-up through 1995. Participants: A total of 2994 asymptomatic North American women, aged 30 to 80 years, without known cardiovascular disease. Main Outcome Measures Cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Results: There were 427 (14%) deaths during 20 years of follow-up, of which 147 were due to cardiovascular causes. Low exercise capacity, low heart rate recovery (HRR), and not achieving target heart rate were independently associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. There was no increased cardiovascular death risk for exercise-induced ST-segment depression (age-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-1.80; P = .96). The age-adjusted hazard ratio for cardiovascular death for every metabolic equivalent (MET) decrement in exercise capacity was 1.20 (95% CI, 1.18-1.30; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1600-1607
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume290
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 25 2003

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Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Lipids
Research
Heart Rate
Metabolic Equivalent
Confidence Intervals
Mortality
Exercise Test
Cardiovascular Diseases
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Ability of Exercise Testing to Predict Cardiovascular and All-Cause Death in Asymptomatic Women : A 20-Year Follow-up of the Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence Study. / Mora, Samia; Redberg, Rita F.; Cui, Yadong; Whiteman, Maura K.; Flaws, Jodi A.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Blumenthal, Roger S.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 290, No. 12, 25.09.2003, p. 1600-1607.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mora, Samia ; Redberg, Rita F. ; Cui, Yadong ; Whiteman, Maura K. ; Flaws, Jodi A. ; Sharrett, A. Richey ; Blumenthal, Roger S. / Ability of Exercise Testing to Predict Cardiovascular and All-Cause Death in Asymptomatic Women : A 20-Year Follow-up of the Lipid Research Clinics Prevalence Study. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 2003 ; Vol. 290, No. 12. pp. 1600-1607.
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