Abdominal cancer, nausea, and vomiting

J. C. Muir, C. F. Von Gunten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nausea and vomiting in abdominal cancer is perhaps one of the most difficult symptom complexes to manage, especially when complicated by bowel obstruction. There are many mechanisms of nausea in advanced abdominal cancer with a number of therapeutic interventions that can significantly enhance symptom control and overall quality of life. As with pain, the ideal approach should include a mechanistic analysis of the causes of nausea beginning with a thorough history, followed by a directed physical examination, and selected laboratory studies. The symptom history, in conjunction with a physical examination and directed tests should direct appropriate pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. The result is often the amelioration of significant suffering and enhanced quality of living.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-394
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Palliative Medicine
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Nausea
Vomiting
Physical Examination
History
Neoplasms
Psychological Stress
Quality of Life
Pain
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Abdominal cancer, nausea, and vomiting. / Muir, J. C.; Von Gunten, C. F.

In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 3, 2001, p. 391-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muir, J. C. ; Von Gunten, C. F. / Abdominal cancer, nausea, and vomiting. In: Journal of Palliative Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 391-394.
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