ABCA1 reducing cellular arsenic accumulation in mammalian cells

X. H. Tan, C. H. Di, Y. F. Cao, L. Yang, L. L. Xian, J. Huang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Arsenic trioxide has been used as a therapeutic agent for many diseases and has good clinical efficacy. However, arsenic resistance in many cells limits its clinical application, and the mechanism is not fully determined. To further understand the mechanism of arsenic resistance, we constructed human arsenic-resistant ECV-304 cells (AsRE) and identified the arsenic resistant related gene ABCA1, which belonged to ATP-binding cassette subfamily in the previous study. In this study, we found that when ABCA1 expression was silenced, the AsRE cells lost their arsenic tolerance, and arsenic accumulation was greater than that of the parental ABCA1-bearing counterparts. Conversely, overexpression of ABCA1 in Hela cells decreased arsenic accumulation, and the cells were more resistant to As(III) than the control that was transfected with empty vector. Our results suggest a novel role for ABCA1 in the development of mammalian arsenic resistance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationUnderstanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress
Subtitle of host publicationArsenic in the Environment
PublisherTaylor and Francis - Balkema
Pages215-217
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)9780415637633
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event4th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, As 2012 - Cairns, QLD, Australia
Duration: Jul 22 2012Jul 27 2012

Publication series

NameUnderstanding the Geological and Medical Interface of Arsenic, As 2012 - 4th International Congress: Arsenic in the Environment

Other

Other4th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, As 2012
CountryAustralia
CityCairns, QLD
Period7/22/127/27/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution

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