AAGL Practice Report: Practice Guidelines on the Prevention of Apical Prolapse at the Time of Benign Hysterectomy

Jason A. Abbott, Krisztina I. Bajzak, Isabel C. Green, Volker R. Jacobs, Neil P. Johnson, Marit Lieng, Malcolm G. Munro, Sukhbir Singh, Eric R. Sokol, I. Sokol, Rosanne Kho, Rebecca U. Margulies, Charles R. Rardin, Eric R. Sokol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pelvic organ prolapse may adversely impact physical, sexual and emotional health. Women with symptomatic prolapse often experience altered bladder and bowel function, increased pelvic pressure, diminution of sexual satisfaction, and altered body image. With increasing vaginal descent, various bladder, bowel, and prolapse symptoms are increased. Approximately 200,000 women undergo inpatient procedures for prolapse in the United States each year, with regional and racial differences in rates of surgery reported. The demand for health care services related to pelvic floor disorders will increase at twice the rate of the population itself.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-722
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

Keywords

  • Apical
  • Hysterectomy
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Posthysterectomy prolapse
  • Richardson angle stitch
  • Sacrospinous ligament fixation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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