A volumetric cone-beam CT system based on a 41×41 cm2 flat-panel imager

D. A. Jaffray, Jeff Siewerdsen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) based upon large-area flat-panel imager (FPI) technology is a flexible and adaptable technology that offers large field-of-view (FOV), high spatial resolution, and soft-tissue imaging. The imaging performance of FPI-based cone-beam CT has been evaluated on a computer-controlled bench-top system using an early prototype FPI with a small FOV (20.5×20.5 cm2). These investigations demonstrate the potential of this exciting technology. In this report, imaging performance is evaluated using a production grade large-area FPI (41×41 cm2) for which the manufacturer has achieved a significant reduction in additive noise. This reduction in additive noise results in a substantial improvement in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at low exposures. The spatial resolution over the increased FOV of the cone-beam CT system is evaluated by imaging a fine steel wire placed at various locations within the volume of reconstruction. The measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system demonstrates spatial frequency pass beyond 1 mm-1 (10% modulation) with a slight degradation at points off the source plane. In addition to investigations of imaging performance, progress has also been made in the integration of this technology with a medical linear accelerator for on-line image-guided radiation therapy. Unlike the bench-top system, this implementation must contend with significant geometric non-idealities caused by gravity-induced flex of the x-ray tube and FPI support assemblies. A method of characterizing and correcting these non-idealities has been developed. Images of an anthropomorphic head phantom qualitatively demonstrate the excellent spatial resolution and large FOV achievable with the cone-beam approach in the clinical implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsL.E. Antonuk, M.J. Yaffe
Pages800-807
Number of pages8
Volume4320
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes
EventMedical Imaging 2001: Physics of Medical Imaging - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 18 2001Feb 20 2001

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2001: Physics of Medical Imaging
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period2/18/012/20/01

Fingerprint

Image sensors
Cones
cones
field of view
Imaging techniques
Additive noise
spatial resolution
seats
x ray tubes
Linear accelerators
Optical transfer function
Radiotherapy
modulation transfer function
linear accelerators
Quantum efficiency
assemblies
Tomography
quantum efficiency
radiation therapy
grade

Keywords

  • Amorphous silicon
  • Cone-beam computed tomography
  • Flat-panel detector
  • Radiation therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Jaffray, D. A., & Siewerdsen, J. (2001). A volumetric cone-beam CT system based on a 41×41 cm2 flat-panel imager. In L. E. Antonuk, & M. J. Yaffe (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 4320, pp. 800-807) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.430910

A volumetric cone-beam CT system based on a 41×41 cm2 flat-panel imager. / Jaffray, D. A.; Siewerdsen, Jeff.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / L.E. Antonuk; M.J. Yaffe. Vol. 4320 2001. p. 800-807.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Jaffray, DA & Siewerdsen, J 2001, A volumetric cone-beam CT system based on a 41×41 cm2 flat-panel imager. in LE Antonuk & MJ Yaffe (eds), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 4320, pp. 800-807, Medical Imaging 2001: Physics of Medical Imaging, San Diego, CA, United States, 2/18/01. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.430910
Jaffray DA, Siewerdsen J. A volumetric cone-beam CT system based on a 41×41 cm2 flat-panel imager. In Antonuk LE, Yaffe MJ, editors, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 4320. 2001. p. 800-807 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.430910
Jaffray, D. A. ; Siewerdsen, Jeff. / A volumetric cone-beam CT system based on a 41×41 cm2 flat-panel imager. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / L.E. Antonuk ; M.J. Yaffe. Vol. 4320 2001. pp. 800-807
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