A very present help: The role of religious support for Black adolescent girls' mental well-being

Theda Rose, Meredith O. Hope, Terrinieka W. Powell, Victoria Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study explored religious emotional support as a mediator of the association between organized religious involvement (ORI) and mental well-being among African American and Caribbean Black girls. Data are drawn from a nationally representative survey of Black adolescents. The sample was composed of African American (n = 412) and Caribbean Black (n = 165) girls, aged 13–17. Structural equation modeling tested direct and indirect effects of ORI on mental well-being, through religious emotional support. For African American girls, ORI was not directly related to any of the mental well-being outcomes. Religious emotional support mediated the association between ORI and self-esteem, mastery, and life satisfaction. For Caribbean Black girls, ORI was negatively associated with mastery and life satisfaction. Religious emotional support mediated the association between ORI and life satisfaction. Results suggest that the well-being benefits of ORI for Black girls only remain significant in the presence of religious emotional support and are different for ethnic subgroups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of community psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Black adolescents
  • Caribbean
  • girls
  • life satisfaction
  • mental well-being
  • religion
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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