A versatile nano display platform from bacterial spore coat proteins

I. Lin Wu, Kedar Narayan, Jean Philippe Castaing, Fang Tian, Sriram Subramaniam, Kumaran S. Ramamurthi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dormant bacterial spores are encased in a thick protein shell, the 'coat', which contains ∼70 different proteins. The coat protects the spore from environmental insults, and is among the most durable static structures in biology. Owing to extensive cross-linking among coat proteins, this structure has been recalcitrant to detailed biochemical analysis, so molecular details of how it assembles are largely unknown. Here, we reconstitute the basement layer of the coat atop spherical membranes supported by silica beads to create artificial spore-like particles. We report that these synthetic spore husk-encased lipid bilayers (SSHELs) assemble and polymerize into a static structure, mimicking in vivo basement layer assembly during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. In addition, we demonstrate that SSHELs may be easily covalently modified with small molecules and proteins. We propose that SSHELs may be versatile display platforms for drugs and vaccines in clinical settings, or for enzymes that neutralize pollutants for environmental remediation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6777
JournalNature Communications
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 10 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacterial Spores
spores
Lipid bilayers
Capsid Proteins
Spores
platforms
Display devices
proteins
Lipid Bilayers
lipids
Proteins
Bacilli
basements
Silicon Dioxide
Vaccines
vaccines
Membranes
Bacillus subtilis
Molecules
Bacillus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Wu, I. L., Narayan, K., Castaing, J. P., Tian, F., Subramaniam, S., & Ramamurthi, K. S. (2015). A versatile nano display platform from bacterial spore coat proteins. Nature Communications, 6, [6777]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms7777

A versatile nano display platform from bacterial spore coat proteins. / Wu, I. Lin; Narayan, Kedar; Castaing, Jean Philippe; Tian, Fang; Subramaniam, Sriram; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 6, 6777, 10.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, IL, Narayan, K, Castaing, JP, Tian, F, Subramaniam, S & Ramamurthi, KS 2015, 'A versatile nano display platform from bacterial spore coat proteins', Nature Communications, vol. 6, 6777. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms7777
Wu IL, Narayan K, Castaing JP, Tian F, Subramaniam S, Ramamurthi KS. A versatile nano display platform from bacterial spore coat proteins. Nature Communications. 2015 Apr 10;6. 6777. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms7777
Wu, I. Lin ; Narayan, Kedar ; Castaing, Jean Philippe ; Tian, Fang ; Subramaniam, Sriram ; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S. / A versatile nano display platform from bacterial spore coat proteins. In: Nature Communications. 2015 ; Vol. 6.
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