A universal granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-producing bystander cell line for use in the formulation of autologous tumor cell- based vaccines

Ivan M Borrello, Eduardo M. Sotomayor, Sara Cooke, Hyam I. Levitsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Irradiated tumor cells transduced with the gene encoding the cytokine GM-CSF have been extensively studied as a vaccine formulation capable of priming systemic antitumor immune responses in the tumor-bearing host. In spite of the therapeutic promise of this vaccine strategy demonstrated in both animal models and early-phase clinical trials, clinical development has been limited by difficulties pertaining to the need to establish in culture the tumor of each patient and to perform individualized gene transfer. To circumvent these issues, we generated an HLA-negative human cell line producing large quantities of human GM-CSF for use as a universal bystander cell to be mixed with unmodified autologous tumor cells in the formulation of a vaccine. This line is easily propagated as a suspension culture in defined, serum-free medium. In a mouse model, we find that vaccination with a mixture of autologous tumor cells and an MHC-negative allogeneic GM-CSF-producing bystander cell primes antitumor immune responses that are equivalent or better than those achieved using autologous tumor cells directly transduced to secrete GM-CSF. This strategy greatly simplifies further clinical development of autologous tumor cell-based vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1983-1991
Number of pages9
JournalHuman Gene Therapy
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 1999

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Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Vaccines
Cell Line
Neoplasms
Serum-Free Culture Media
Genes
Suspensions
Vaccination
Animal Models
Clinical Trials
Cytokines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

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A universal granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-producing bystander cell line for use in the formulation of autologous tumor cell- based vaccines. / Borrello, Ivan M; Sotomayor, Eduardo M.; Cooke, Sara; Levitsky, Hyam I.

In: Human Gene Therapy, Vol. 10, No. 12, 10.08.1999, p. 1983-1991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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