A test of the moderating role of importance of appearance in the relationship between perceived scar severity and body-esteem among adult burn survivors

John W. Lawrence, James A. Fauerbach, Brett D. Thombs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that the relationship between subjective burn scar severity and body-esteem is moderated by importance of appearance. Three hundred and forty-six adult burn survivors completed a mailed or online survey. The three subscales of the Body-Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults (BE-Appearance [satisfaction with general appearance], BE-Weight [weight satisfaction], BE-Others [others' evaluations of one's body and appearance]) were regressed onto sex, subjective burn scar severity, importance of appearance and their two- and three-way interactions. With one exception, the hypothesized main effects were significant in each of the regression equations. As hypothesized, importance of appearance moderated the relationship between subjective burn scar severity and body-esteem for BE-Appearance and BE-Other but not BE-Weight. The results of this study are consistent with the cognitive model of body-esteem. Clinical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-111
Number of pages11
JournalBody Image
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

Keywords

  • Body image
  • Body-esteem
  • Burns
  • Disfigurement
  • Importance of appearance
  • Physical distinctions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A test of the moderating role of importance of appearance in the relationship between perceived scar severity and body-esteem among adult burn survivors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this