A Systematic Review of the Effect of Rotavirus Vaccination on Diarrhea Outcomes Among Children Younger Than 5 Years

Laura M. Lamberti, Sania Ashraf, Christa L Fischer Walker, Robert E Black

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Rotavirus is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable diarrhea among children under-five globally. Rotavirus vaccination has been shown to prevent severe rotavirus infections with varying efficacy and effectiveness by region. METHODS:: We sought to generate updated region-specific estimates of rotavirus vaccine efficacy and effectiveness. We systematically reviewed published vaccine efficacy and effectiveness studies to assess the region- specific effect of rotavirus vaccination on select diarrheal morbidity and mortality outcomes in children under-five years of age. We employed meta-analytic methods to generate pooled effect sizes by Millennium Development Goal (MDG) region. RESULTS:: Rotavirus vaccination was both efficacious and effective in preventing rotavirus diarrhea, severe rotavirus diarrhea and rotavirus hospitalizations among children under-five across all regions represented by the 48 included studies. Efficacy against severe rotavirus diarrhea ranged from 90.6% (95% CI: 82.3-95.0%) in the Developed region to 88.4% (67.1-95.9%) in Eastern/Southeastern Asia, 79.6% (71.3-85.5%) in Latin America and the Caribbean, 50.0% (34.4-61.9%) in Southern Asia, and 46.1% (29.1-59.1%) in sub Saharan Africa. Region-specific effectiveness followed a similar pattern. There was also evidence of vaccine efficacy against severe diarrhea and diarrheal hospitalizations. CONCLUSION:: Our findings confirm the protective efficacy and effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination against rotavirus diarrheal outcomes among children under-five globally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 31 2016

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Rotavirus
Diarrhea
Vaccination
Vaccines
Hospitalization
Rotavirus Vaccines
Rotavirus Infections
Southeastern Asia
Far East
Latin America
Africa South of the Sahara
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

A Systematic Review of the Effect of Rotavirus Vaccination on Diarrhea Outcomes Among Children Younger Than 5 Years. / Lamberti, Laura M.; Ashraf, Sania; Walker, Christa L Fischer; Black, Robert E.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 31.05.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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