A survey study of pregnant women and healthcare practitioners assessing the knowledge of attitudes and practices of hepatitis B management at a teaching hospital in Kumasi, Ghana, West Africa

Anita Cheng, Jo Ann Jose, Roderick Larsen-Reindorf, Christina Small, Helen Nde, Lara Dugas, Stephan Ehrhardt, Kenrad Edwin Nelson, Eche Ezeanolue, Jennifer Layden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major global health problem, with sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), including West Africa, bearing a large proportion of cases. Mother-to-child and early childhood horizontal transmission, the most common mechanisms of disease spread in West Africa, lead to a high rate of chronic infection. Although these transmission mechanisms are preventable through vaccine and hepatitis B immunoglobulin, they are not routinely used due to limited resources. Antiviral therapy in pregnant women who are HBV positive is another option to reduce transmission. We conducted a survey study of pregnant women and clinicians at a teaching hospital in West Africa to determine the knowledge base about HBV and willingness to implement measures to reduce HBV transmission. Pregnant women had limited knowledge about HBV and the common transmission mechanisms. Clinicians identified cost and time as the major barriers to implementation of HBV prevention measures. Both pregnant women and clinicians were largely willing to implement and use measures, including antivirals, to help reduce HBV transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-3
Number of pages3
JournalOpen Forum Infectious Diseases
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Ghana
Western Africa
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis B virus
Teaching Hospitals
Pregnant Women
Delivery of Health Care
Antiviral Agents
Hepatitis B Vaccines
Knowledge Bases
Africa South of the Sahara
Virus Diseases
Surveys and Questionnaires
Immunoglobulins
Mothers
Costs and Cost Analysis
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

A survey study of pregnant women and healthcare practitioners assessing the knowledge of attitudes and practices of hepatitis B management at a teaching hospital in Kumasi, Ghana, West Africa. / Cheng, Anita; Jose, Jo Ann; Larsen-Reindorf, Roderick; Small, Christina; Nde, Helen; Dugas, Lara; Ehrhardt, Stephan; Nelson, Kenrad Edwin; Ezeanolue, Eche; Layden, Jennifer.

In: Open Forum Infectious Diseases, Vol. 2, No. 4, 2015, p. 1-3.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, Anita ; Jose, Jo Ann ; Larsen-Reindorf, Roderick ; Small, Christina ; Nde, Helen ; Dugas, Lara ; Ehrhardt, Stephan ; Nelson, Kenrad Edwin ; Ezeanolue, Eche ; Layden, Jennifer. / A survey study of pregnant women and healthcare practitioners assessing the knowledge of attitudes and practices of hepatitis B management at a teaching hospital in Kumasi, Ghana, West Africa. In: Open Forum Infectious Diseases. 2015 ; Vol. 2, No. 4. pp. 1-3.
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