A survey of anesthesiologists' knowledge of American Heart Association Pediatric Advanced Life Support Resuscitation Guidelines

Eugenie S. Heitmiller, Kristen Nelson, Elizabeth Hunt, Jamie Schwartz, Myron Yaster, Donald Harry Shaffner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim of study: Determine anesthesiologists' knowledge of the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) recommendations. Methods: After obtaining institutional review board approval, a survey was sent in February 2007 to members of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia via a web-based survey tool, and re-sent to nonresponders five times over the following 7 months. Results: Overall response rate was 51% (389/768 members). Eighty-five percent of respondents had pediatric anesthesia fellowships, 71% provided anesthesia primarily to children, 71% had been in practice >10 years, 29% had PALS or APLS training during the previous year, and 37% had a patient requiring chest compressions in the previous year. Overall, 89% of respondents knew the correct initial dose of epinephrine (adrenaline) for asystole, 44% knew subsequent management for asystole if initial epinephrine dose was ineffective, 49% knew defibrillation sequence to treat pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT), and 73% knew the medication sequence to treat pulseless VT. Only those respondents who reported to be in practice for >10 years scored significantly (p <0.0001) better on all resuscitation treatment questions. Respondents who had PALS or APLS training in the previous year or previous 2 years scored significantly better on the defibrillation sequence for pulseless VT (p = 0.001 and p = 0.045, respectively), and the medication sequence for pulseless VT (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.011, respectively) when compared with those who had no previous training. Conclusion: Deficiencies exist in the knowledge of current AHA PALS guidelines among anesthesiologists. Formal resuscitation training programs should be considered in ongoing continuing medical education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-505
Number of pages7
JournalResuscitation
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Fingerprint

Resuscitation
Guidelines
Ventricular Tachycardia
Pediatrics
Epinephrine
Heart Arrest
Anesthesia
American Heart Association
Continuing Medical Education
Research Ethics Committees
Surveys and Questionnaires
Anesthesiologists
Thorax
Education

Keywords

  • Advanced life support (ALS)
  • American Heart Association
  • Anaesthesia
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Intraosseus
  • Paediatric resuscitation
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Emergency
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

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title = "A survey of anesthesiologists' knowledge of American Heart Association Pediatric Advanced Life Support Resuscitation Guidelines",
abstract = "Aim of study: Determine anesthesiologists' knowledge of the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) recommendations. Methods: After obtaining institutional review board approval, a survey was sent in February 2007 to members of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia via a web-based survey tool, and re-sent to nonresponders five times over the following 7 months. Results: Overall response rate was 51{\%} (389/768 members). Eighty-five percent of respondents had pediatric anesthesia fellowships, 71{\%} provided anesthesia primarily to children, 71{\%} had been in practice >10 years, 29{\%} had PALS or APLS training during the previous year, and 37{\%} had a patient requiring chest compressions in the previous year. Overall, 89{\%} of respondents knew the correct initial dose of epinephrine (adrenaline) for asystole, 44{\%} knew subsequent management for asystole if initial epinephrine dose was ineffective, 49{\%} knew defibrillation sequence to treat pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT), and 73{\%} knew the medication sequence to treat pulseless VT. Only those respondents who reported to be in practice for >10 years scored significantly (p <0.0001) better on all resuscitation treatment questions. Respondents who had PALS or APLS training in the previous year or previous 2 years scored significantly better on the defibrillation sequence for pulseless VT (p = 0.001 and p = 0.045, respectively), and the medication sequence for pulseless VT (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.011, respectively) when compared with those who had no previous training. Conclusion: Deficiencies exist in the knowledge of current AHA PALS guidelines among anesthesiologists. Formal resuscitation training programs should be considered in ongoing continuing medical education.",
keywords = "Advanced life support (ALS), American Heart Association, Anaesthesia, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Intraosseus, Paediatric resuscitation, Training",
author = "Heitmiller, {Eugenie S.} and Kristen Nelson and Elizabeth Hunt and Jamie Schwartz and Myron Yaster and Shaffner, {Donald Harry}",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.resuscitation.2008.07.018",
language = "English (US)",
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pages = "499--505",
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AU - Heitmiller, Eugenie S.

AU - Nelson, Kristen

AU - Hunt, Elizabeth

AU - Schwartz, Jamie

AU - Yaster, Myron

AU - Shaffner, Donald Harry

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