A subgroup of microsatellite stable colorectal cancers has elevated mutation rates and different responses to alkylating and oxidising agents

A. R. Parker, C. P. Leonard, L. Hua, R. O. Francis, S. Dhara, A. Maitra, J. R. Eshleman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An early step in the carcinogenesis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and some sporadic colorectal cancers (CRCs) is the acquisition of a 'mutator phenotype' resulting from defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, which normally maintain genomic stability. This mutator phenotype causes an approximately 100-1000-fold increase in base substitutions and small insertion/deletion mutations thereby driving carcinogenesis. It also causes genome-wide microsatellite instability (MSI) due to the inability to repair mutations within these small, hard to replicate, repetitive DNA elements. In contrast, less is known about the role of mutator phenotypes in microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC. In this report, we have measured the mutation rates in 11 MSS CRC cell lines to obtain an estimate of the prevalence of mutator phenotypes in MSS carcinogenesis. Of the 11 cell lines, three of them (27%) possess spontaneous hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase mutation rates approximately 10-100-fold above background. When challenged with alkylating and oxidising agents the degree of survival and apoptotic responses are different, indicating that these cell lines may represent more than one mutator phenotype. These data demonstrate that a significant portion of MSS CRC cell lines has increased mutation rates and that this may play a role in MSS CRC carcinogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1666-1671
Number of pages6
JournalBritish journal of cancer
Volume90
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 19 2004

Keywords

  • 6-thioguanine
  • Colorectal cancer
  • MSI
  • MSS
  • Microsatellite stable
  • Mutator phenotypes
  • hprt

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A subgroup of microsatellite stable colorectal cancers has elevated mutation rates and different responses to alkylating and oxidising agents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this