A study of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drops and no pressure patching in the treatment of corneal abrasions

P. K. Kaiser, R. Pineda, B. An, S. Brun, S. Burk, R. Kim, M. Krzystolik, K. Graham, Q. Nguyen, S. Rowe, M. Ryan-Graham, J. Smith, A. Vinals, S. Yoo, T. You

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an ophthalmic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) in the treatment of noninfected, non-contact lens-related, traumatic corneal abrasions and no pressure patch. Design: A single-center, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study. Participants: One hundred patients with noninfected, non-contact lens- related, traumatic or foreign body removal-related corneal abrasions less than 36 hours in duration. Intervention: All patients received a cycloplegic drop and erythromycin or polymyxin B (Polysporin Ophthalmic Ointment, Burroughs Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC). Patients were then randomized to receive either ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution or control vehicle drops. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures were six subjective symptoms monitored daily, evaluation of corneal abrasion, and determination of adverse events. Long-term complications were determined 3 to 8 months after randomization. Results: Twelve patients were excluded from the study. One day after randomization, patients receiving ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution noted significantly decreased levels of pain (P <0.002), photophobia (P <0.009), and foreign body sensation (P <0.003) as compared with the control vehicle group. In addition, the time to resumption of normal activities was shorter in the group who received ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution (P <0.001). There was no statistical difference in the amount of tearing, healing time, acuity changes, or complication rates between the two groups. Conclusions: Ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution provides increased patient comfort without clinical adverse effects when used as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of noninfected, non-contact lens-related, traumatic corneal abrasions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1353-1359
Number of pages7
JournalOphthalmology
Volume104
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Ketorolac Tromethamine
Ophthalmic Solutions
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pressure
Lenses
Random Allocation
Foreign Bodies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Mydriatics
Therapeutics
Polymyxin B
Photophobia
Placebos
Pain
Control Groups
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Kaiser, P. K., Pineda, R., An, B., Brun, S., Burk, S., Kim, R., ... You, T. (1997). A study of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drops and no pressure patching in the treatment of corneal abrasions. Ophthalmology, 104(8), 1353-1359.

A study of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drops and no pressure patching in the treatment of corneal abrasions. / Kaiser, P. K.; Pineda, R.; An, B.; Brun, S.; Burk, S.; Kim, R.; Krzystolik, M.; Graham, K.; Nguyen, Q.; Rowe, S.; Ryan-Graham, M.; Smith, J.; Vinals, A.; Yoo, S.; You, T.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 104, No. 8, 1997, p. 1353-1359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaiser, PK, Pineda, R, An, B, Brun, S, Burk, S, Kim, R, Krzystolik, M, Graham, K, Nguyen, Q, Rowe, S, Ryan-Graham, M, Smith, J, Vinals, A, Yoo, S & You, T 1997, 'A study of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drops and no pressure patching in the treatment of corneal abrasions', Ophthalmology, vol. 104, no. 8, pp. 1353-1359.
Kaiser, P. K. ; Pineda, R. ; An, B. ; Brun, S. ; Burk, S. ; Kim, R. ; Krzystolik, M. ; Graham, K. ; Nguyen, Q. ; Rowe, S. ; Ryan-Graham, M. ; Smith, J. ; Vinals, A. ; Yoo, S. ; You, T. / A study of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drops and no pressure patching in the treatment of corneal abrasions. In: Ophthalmology. 1997 ; Vol. 104, No. 8. pp. 1353-1359.
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abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an ophthalmic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) in the treatment of noninfected, non-contact lens-related, traumatic corneal abrasions and no pressure patch. Design: A single-center, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study. Participants: One hundred patients with noninfected, non-contact lens- related, traumatic or foreign body removal-related corneal abrasions less than 36 hours in duration. Intervention: All patients received a cycloplegic drop and erythromycin or polymyxin B (Polysporin Ophthalmic Ointment, Burroughs Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC). Patients were then randomized to receive either ketorolac tromethamine 0.5{\%} ophthalmic solution or control vehicle drops. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures were six subjective symptoms monitored daily, evaluation of corneal abrasion, and determination of adverse events. Long-term complications were determined 3 to 8 months after randomization. Results: Twelve patients were excluded from the study. One day after randomization, patients receiving ketorolac tromethamine 0.5{\%} ophthalmic solution noted significantly decreased levels of pain (P <0.002), photophobia (P <0.009), and foreign body sensation (P <0.003) as compared with the control vehicle group. In addition, the time to resumption of normal activities was shorter in the group who received ketorolac tromethamine 0.5{\%} ophthalmic solution (P <0.001). There was no statistical difference in the amount of tearing, healing time, acuity changes, or complication rates between the two groups. Conclusions: Ketorolac tromethamine 0.5{\%} ophthalmic solution provides increased patient comfort without clinical adverse effects when used as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of noninfected, non-contact lens-related, traumatic corneal abrasions.",
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T1 - A study of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drops and no pressure patching in the treatment of corneal abrasions

AU - Kaiser, P. K.

AU - Pineda, R.

AU - An, B.

AU - Brun, S.

AU - Burk, S.

AU - Kim, R.

AU - Krzystolik, M.

AU - Graham, K.

AU - Nguyen, Q.

AU - Rowe, S.

AU - Ryan-Graham, M.

AU - Smith, J.

AU - Vinals, A.

AU - Yoo, S.

AU - You, T.

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an ophthalmic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) in the treatment of noninfected, non-contact lens-related, traumatic corneal abrasions and no pressure patch. Design: A single-center, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study. Participants: One hundred patients with noninfected, non-contact lens- related, traumatic or foreign body removal-related corneal abrasions less than 36 hours in duration. Intervention: All patients received a cycloplegic drop and erythromycin or polymyxin B (Polysporin Ophthalmic Ointment, Burroughs Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC). Patients were then randomized to receive either ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution or control vehicle drops. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures were six subjective symptoms monitored daily, evaluation of corneal abrasion, and determination of adverse events. Long-term complications were determined 3 to 8 months after randomization. Results: Twelve patients were excluded from the study. One day after randomization, patients receiving ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution noted significantly decreased levels of pain (P <0.002), photophobia (P <0.009), and foreign body sensation (P <0.003) as compared with the control vehicle group. In addition, the time to resumption of normal activities was shorter in the group who received ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution (P <0.001). There was no statistical difference in the amount of tearing, healing time, acuity changes, or complication rates between the two groups. Conclusions: Ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution provides increased patient comfort without clinical adverse effects when used as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of noninfected, non-contact lens-related, traumatic corneal abrasions.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an ophthalmic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) in the treatment of noninfected, non-contact lens-related, traumatic corneal abrasions and no pressure patch. Design: A single-center, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled study. Participants: One hundred patients with noninfected, non-contact lens- related, traumatic or foreign body removal-related corneal abrasions less than 36 hours in duration. Intervention: All patients received a cycloplegic drop and erythromycin or polymyxin B (Polysporin Ophthalmic Ointment, Burroughs Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC). Patients were then randomized to receive either ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution or control vehicle drops. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures were six subjective symptoms monitored daily, evaluation of corneal abrasion, and determination of adverse events. Long-term complications were determined 3 to 8 months after randomization. Results: Twelve patients were excluded from the study. One day after randomization, patients receiving ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution noted significantly decreased levels of pain (P <0.002), photophobia (P <0.009), and foreign body sensation (P <0.003) as compared with the control vehicle group. In addition, the time to resumption of normal activities was shorter in the group who received ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution (P <0.001). There was no statistical difference in the amount of tearing, healing time, acuity changes, or complication rates between the two groups. Conclusions: Ketorolac tromethamine 0.5% ophthalmic solution provides increased patient comfort without clinical adverse effects when used as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of noninfected, non-contact lens-related, traumatic corneal abrasions.

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