A statistical model for image registration performance

Effect of tissue deformation

M. D. Ketcha, T. De Silva, R. Han, A. Uneri, M. W. Jacobson, S. Vogt, G. Kleinszig, Jeff Siewerdsen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Purpose: The accuracy of image registration is a critical factor in image-guidance systems, so it is important to quantifiably understand factors that fundamentally limit performance of the registration task. In this work, we extend a recently derived model for the effect of quantum noise on registration error to a more "generalized" model in which tissue deformation is incorporated as an additional source of "noise" described by a power-law distribution, analogous to "anatomical clutter" in signal detection theory. Methods: We apply a statistical framework that incorporates objective image quality factors such as spatial resolution and image noise combined with a statistical representation of anatomical clutter to predict the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of transformation parameters in a rigid registration. Model predictions are compared to simulation studies in CT-to-CT slice registration using the cross-correlation (CC) similarity metric. Results: RMSE predictions are shown to accurately model the impact of dose and soft-tissue clutter on measured RMSE performance. Further, these predictions reveal dose levels at which the registration becomes soft-tissue clutter limited, where further increase provides no improvement in registration performance. Conclusions: Incorporating tissue deformation into a statistical registration model is an important step in understanding the limits of image registration performance and selecting pertinent registration methods for a particular registration task. The generalized noise model and RMSE analysis provide insight on how to optimize registration tasks with respect to image acquisition protocol (e.g., dose, reconstruction parameters) and registration method (e.g., level of blur).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Imaging 2018
Subtitle of host publicationImage Processing
PublisherSPIE
Volume10574
ISBN (Electronic)9781510616370
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
EventMedical Imaging 2018: Image Processing - Houston, United States
Duration: Feb 11 2018Feb 13 2018

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2018: Image Processing
CountryUnited States
CityHouston
Period2/11/182/13/18

Fingerprint

Image registration
Statistical Models
clutter
Tissue
Noise
dosage
Task Performance and Analysis
predictions
Quantum noise
Image acquisition
signal detection
Signal detection
error analysis
Error analysis
cross correlation
Image quality
Q factors
acquisition
spatial resolution
simulation

Keywords

  • CT/CBCT
  • Fisher Information
  • Image Quality
  • Image Registration
  • Image-Guided Procedures
  • Performance Limits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Ketcha, M. D., De Silva, T., Han, R., Uneri, A., Jacobson, M. W., Vogt, S., ... Siewerdsen, J. (2018). A statistical model for image registration performance: Effect of tissue deformation. In Medical Imaging 2018: Image Processing (Vol. 10574). [105740W] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2293638

A statistical model for image registration performance : Effect of tissue deformation. / Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Han, R.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M. W.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Siewerdsen, Jeff.

Medical Imaging 2018: Image Processing. Vol. 10574 SPIE, 2018. 105740W.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ketcha, MD, De Silva, T, Han, R, Uneri, A, Jacobson, MW, Vogt, S, Kleinszig, G & Siewerdsen, J 2018, A statistical model for image registration performance: Effect of tissue deformation. in Medical Imaging 2018: Image Processing. vol. 10574, 105740W, SPIE, Medical Imaging 2018: Image Processing, Houston, United States, 2/11/18. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2293638
Ketcha MD, De Silva T, Han R, Uneri A, Jacobson MW, Vogt S et al. A statistical model for image registration performance: Effect of tissue deformation. In Medical Imaging 2018: Image Processing. Vol. 10574. SPIE. 2018. 105740W https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2293638
Ketcha, M. D. ; De Silva, T. ; Han, R. ; Uneri, A. ; Jacobson, M. W. ; Vogt, S. ; Kleinszig, G. ; Siewerdsen, Jeff. / A statistical model for image registration performance : Effect of tissue deformation. Medical Imaging 2018: Image Processing. Vol. 10574 SPIE, 2018.
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