A simple method to estimate the roles of learning, inventories and category consideration in consumer choice

Andrew Ching, Tülin Erdem, Michael P. Keane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Models of consumer learning and inventory behavior have both proven to be valuable for explaining consumer choice dynamics. In their pure form these models assume consumers solve complex dynamic programming (DP) problems to determine optimal choices. For this reason, these models are best viewed as "as if" approximations to consumer behavior. In this paper we present an estimation method, based on Geweke and Keane (2000), which allows us to estimate dynamic models without solving a DP problem and without strong assumptions about how consumers form expectations about the future. The relatively low computational burden of this method allows us to nest the learning and inventory models. We also incorporate the "price consideration" mechanism of Ching et al. (2009), which essentially says that consumers may not pay attention to a category in every period. The resulting model may be viewed as providing a more "realistic" or "descriptive" account of consumer choice behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-72
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Choice Modelling
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Consumer behavior
Estimate
Dynamic Programming
Dynamic programming
Consumer Behaviour
Nest
Inventory Model
Complex Dynamics
Model
Dynamic Model
Dynamic models
Learning
Consumer choice
Approximation
Form
Consumer behaviour
Inventory behavior
Learning behavior
Burden
Choice behavior

Keywords

  • Dynamics
  • Expectations
  • Inventory
  • Learning
  • Structural model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty

Cite this

A simple method to estimate the roles of learning, inventories and category consideration in consumer choice. / Ching, Andrew; Erdem, Tülin; Keane, Michael P.

In: Journal of Choice Modelling, Vol. 13, 01.01.2014, p. 60-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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