A shared pathway of antisocial risk: A path model of parent and child effects

Dylan B. Jackson, Kevin M. Beaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The current study explores the possibility that the antisocial traits and behaviors of parents and children have persistent, bidirectional effects on each other that contribute to a pathway of shared risk. Method: We employ data from the Early Longitudinal Child Survey, Kindergarten (ECLS-K), a national, longitudinal study of children. Path analysis was used to test our hypothesis. Results: The results suggest that there is substantial stability in antisocial traits of parents and children over time. While only child risk was found to predict parent risk during early childhood, both parent risk and child risk influenced each other from late childhood to early adolescence. Conclusions: Stability in the antisocial traits and behaviors of parents and their children is a function of both parent-driven and child-driven effects over time, with child and parenting effects being differentially relevant depending on the life stage examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-163
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

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