A secondary analysis examining the concordance of self-perception of weight and actual measurement of body fat percentage: The CRONICAS Cohort Study

Anthony L. Bui, Miguel G. Moscoso, Antonio Bernabe-Ortiz, William Checkley, Robert H Gilman, Liam Smeeth, J. Jaime Miranda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Individuals' self-perceptions of weight often differ from objective measurements of body fat. This study aimed to 1) measure agreement between self-perceptions of weight and objective measurement of body fat by bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) among Peruvian adults; and 2) quantify the association between body fat and a) baseline self-perceptions of weight and b) whether a participant underestimated their weight status. Methods: Longitudinal data from the CRONICAS Cohort Study of 3181 Peruvian adults aged 35-years and older were used. BIA measurements of body fat were categorized across four nominal descriptions: low weight, normal, overweight, and obese. Kappa statistics were estimated to compare BIA measurements with baseline self-perceptions of weight. To quantify the association between body fat over time with both baseline self-perceptions of weight and underestimation of weight status, random effects models, controlling for socioeconomic and demographic covariates, were employed. Results: Of the 3181 participants, 1111 (34.9%) were overweight and 649 (20.4%) were obese at baseline. Agreement between self-perceived and BIA weight status was found among 43.1% of participants, while 49.9% underestimated and 6.9% overestimated their weight status. Weighted kappa statistics ranged from 0.20 to 0.31 across settings, suggesting poor agreement. Compared to perceiving oneself as normal, perceiving oneself as underweight, overweight, or obese was associated with - 4.1 (p < 0.001), + 5.2 (p < 0.001), and + 8.1 (p < 0.001) body fat percentage points, respectively. Underestimating one's weight status was associated with having 2.4 (p < 0.001) body fat percentage points more than those not underestimating only after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic covariates. Conclusions: Half of study participants were overweight or obese. There was poor agreement between self-perceptions of weight with BIA measurements of body fat, indicating that individuals often believe they weigh less than they actually do. Underestimating one's weight status was associated with having more body fat percentage points, but was only statistically significant after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Further research should be conducted to investigate how self-perceptions of weight can support clinical and public health interventions to curb the obesity epidemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9
JournalBMC Obesity
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Self Concept
Adipose Tissue
Cohort Studies
Weights and Measures
Electric Impedance
Demography
Thinness
Public Health
Obesity

Keywords

  • Chronic disease
  • Obesity
  • Peru
  • Weight self-perceptions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

A secondary analysis examining the concordance of self-perception of weight and actual measurement of body fat percentage : The CRONICAS Cohort Study. / Bui, Anthony L.; Moscoso, Miguel G.; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Checkley, William; Gilman, Robert H; Smeeth, Liam; Miranda, J. Jaime.

In: BMC Obesity, Vol. 6, No. 1, 9, 01.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Individuals' self-perceptions of weight often differ from objective measurements of body fat. This study aimed to 1) measure agreement between self-perceptions of weight and objective measurement of body fat by bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) among Peruvian adults; and 2) quantify the association between body fat and a) baseline self-perceptions of weight and b) whether a participant underestimated their weight status. Methods: Longitudinal data from the CRONICAS Cohort Study of 3181 Peruvian adults aged 35-years and older were used. BIA measurements of body fat were categorized across four nominal descriptions: low weight, normal, overweight, and obese. Kappa statistics were estimated to compare BIA measurements with baseline self-perceptions of weight. To quantify the association between body fat over time with both baseline self-perceptions of weight and underestimation of weight status, random effects models, controlling for socioeconomic and demographic covariates, were employed. Results: Of the 3181 participants, 1111 (34.9{\%}) were overweight and 649 (20.4{\%}) were obese at baseline. Agreement between self-perceived and BIA weight status was found among 43.1{\%} of participants, while 49.9{\%} underestimated and 6.9{\%} overestimated their weight status. Weighted kappa statistics ranged from 0.20 to 0.31 across settings, suggesting poor agreement. Compared to perceiving oneself as normal, perceiving oneself as underweight, overweight, or obese was associated with - 4.1 (p < 0.001), + 5.2 (p < 0.001), and + 8.1 (p < 0.001) body fat percentage points, respectively. Underestimating one's weight status was associated with having 2.4 (p < 0.001) body fat percentage points more than those not underestimating only after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic covariates. Conclusions: Half of study participants were overweight or obese. There was poor agreement between self-perceptions of weight with BIA measurements of body fat, indicating that individuals often believe they weigh less than they actually do. Underestimating one's weight status was associated with having more body fat percentage points, but was only statistically significant after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Further research should be conducted to investigate how self-perceptions of weight can support clinical and public health interventions to curb the obesity epidemic.",
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AU - Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

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AU - Miranda, J. Jaime

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