A review of the genetic epidemiology of resistance to parasitic disease and atopic asthma

Common variants for common phenotypes?

Kathleen C. Barnes, Audrey V. Grant, Peisong Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose of review: An inverse relationship between resistance to certain parasitic diseases and measures of atopy and asthma has long been observed. A possible explanation is that genetic determinants which confer protection against detrimental worm burdens are the same determinants involved in atopic asthma. The focus of this review is to consider the potential candidate genes that have been elucidated as part of molecular, genomic and genetic studies of parasite biology, host-parasite interactions and classic genetic epidemiology studies on parasitic disease and allergic asthma. Recent findings: Comparative studies of the Plasmodium and Schistosoma spp. genomes have revealed a number of proteins that are homologous to humans. A number of linkage and association studies on susceptibility/resistance to parasitic diseases, including malaria and schistosomiasis, overlap with associations that have been identified for susceptibility to atopy and asthma. Summary: In response to parasitic approaches in maintaining survival, the human host has evolved genetic adaptations that minimize severe manifestations of disease, which conversely appear to contribute to allergic disease. A clearer understanding of this process will elucidate the complex pathways and mechanisms involved in these traits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-385
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume5
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Parasitic Diseases
Molecular Epidemiology
Asthma
Phenotype
Schistosoma
Host-Parasite Interactions
Plasmodium
Schistosomiasis
Malaria
Molecular Biology
Parasites
Genome
Survival
Genes
Proteins

Keywords

  • Atopy
  • Genes
  • Parasite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

A review of the genetic epidemiology of resistance to parasitic disease and atopic asthma : Common variants for common phenotypes? / Barnes, Kathleen C.; Grant, Audrey V.; Gao, Peisong.

In: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 5, No. 5, 10.2005, p. 379-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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