A rationale for cognitively-based resilience and psychological first aid (PFA) training: A structural modeling analysis

George S. Everly, Kenneth J. Smith, Jeffrey M. Lating

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Based on the recommendations of Rodgers (2010) and practices by Smith, Davy, & Everly (2007) and Everly, Smith, and Welzant (2008), structural modeling was used in this investigation designed to better discern causal mechanisms within the cognitive-affective arousal construct that contribute to burnout, job dissatisfaction, turnover intention, and performance. The primary purpose of this study was to better inform those interested in program develop and clinical intervention of the nature of mechanisms of pathogenesis and resiliency. This study utilized the responses of the 491 individuals employed in public accounting. Results indicate that the cognitive-affective domain is an essential determinant of burnout, job dissatisfaction, turnover intention, and performance. Furthermore, cognitive states appear to exert their effect through affective arousal that subsequently appears to have a defining role in the development of the aforementioned variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-262
Number of pages14
JournalInternational journal of emergency mental health
Volume11
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Job satisfaction
  • PFA
  • Psychological first aid
  • Psychological resistance
  • Resilience
  • Turnover intention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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