A randomized, controlled trial of mirror therapy for upper extremity phantom limb pain in male amputees

Sacha B. Finn, Briana N. Perry, Jay E. Clasing, Lisa S. Walters, Sandra L. Jarzombek, Sean Curran, Minoo Rouhanian, Mary Keszler, Lindsay K. Hussey-Andersen, Sharon R. Weeks, Paul F. Pasquina, Jack W. Tsao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Phantom limb pain (PLP) is prevalent in patients post-amputation and is difficult to treat. We assessed the efficacy of mirror therapy in relieving PLP in unilateral, upper extremity male amputees. Methods: Fifteen participants from Walter Reed and Brooke Army Medical Centers were randomly assigned to one of two groups: mirror therapy (n = 9) or control (n = 6, covered mirror or mental visualization therapy). Participants were asked to perform 15 min of their assigned therapy daily for 5 days/week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome was pain as measured using a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale. Results: Subjects in the mirror therapy group had a significant decrease in pain scores, from a mean of 44.1 (SD = 17.0) to 27.5 (SD = 17.2) mm (p = 0.002). In addition, there was a significant decrease in daily time experiencing pain, from a mean of 1,022 (SD = 673) to 448 (SD = 565) minutes (p = 0.003). By contrast, the control group had neither diminished pain (p = 0.65) nor decreased overall time experiencing pain (p = 0.49). A pain decrement response seen by the 10th treatment session was predictive of final efficacy. Conclusion: These results confirm that mirror therapy is an effective therapy for PLP in unilateral, upper extremity male amputees, reducing both severity and duration of daily episodes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number267
JournalFrontiers in Neurology
Volume8
Issue numberJUL
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 7 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Phantom Limb
Amputees
Upper Extremity
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pain
Group Psychotherapy
Therapeutics
Visual Analog Scale
Amputation
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Amputee
  • Mental visualization
  • Mirror therapy
  • Phantom limb pain
  • Upper extremity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Finn, S. B., Perry, B. N., Clasing, J. E., Walters, L. S., Jarzombek, S. L., Curran, S., ... Tsao, J. W. (2017). A randomized, controlled trial of mirror therapy for upper extremity phantom limb pain in male amputees. Frontiers in Neurology, 8(JUL), [267]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2017.00267

A randomized, controlled trial of mirror therapy for upper extremity phantom limb pain in male amputees. / Finn, Sacha B.; Perry, Briana N.; Clasing, Jay E.; Walters, Lisa S.; Jarzombek, Sandra L.; Curran, Sean; Rouhanian, Minoo; Keszler, Mary; Hussey-Andersen, Lindsay K.; Weeks, Sharon R.; Pasquina, Paul F.; Tsao, Jack W.

In: Frontiers in Neurology, Vol. 8, No. JUL, 267, 07.07.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Finn, SB, Perry, BN, Clasing, JE, Walters, LS, Jarzombek, SL, Curran, S, Rouhanian, M, Keszler, M, Hussey-Andersen, LK, Weeks, SR, Pasquina, PF & Tsao, JW 2017, 'A randomized, controlled trial of mirror therapy for upper extremity phantom limb pain in male amputees', Frontiers in Neurology, vol. 8, no. JUL, 267. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2017.00267
Finn, Sacha B. ; Perry, Briana N. ; Clasing, Jay E. ; Walters, Lisa S. ; Jarzombek, Sandra L. ; Curran, Sean ; Rouhanian, Minoo ; Keszler, Mary ; Hussey-Andersen, Lindsay K. ; Weeks, Sharon R. ; Pasquina, Paul F. ; Tsao, Jack W. / A randomized, controlled trial of mirror therapy for upper extremity phantom limb pain in male amputees. In: Frontiers in Neurology. 2017 ; Vol. 8, No. JUL.
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