A randomised trial of a computer-delivered screening and brief intervention for postpartum alcohol use

Steven J. Ondersma, Dace S. Svikis, Leroy R. Thacker, Jessica R. Beatty, Nancy Lockhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abstract: Introduction and Aims: Most women cut down or quit alcohol use during pregnancy, but return to pre-pregnancy levels of use after giving birth. Universal screening and brief intervention for alcohol use has shown promise, but has proven challenging to implement and has rarely been evaluated with postpartum women. This trial evaluated a single 20-min, electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) for alcohol use among postpartum women. Design and Methods: In this parallel group randomised trial, 123 postpartum, low-income, primarily African-American women meeting criteria for unhealthy alcohol use were randomly assigned to either a tailored e-SBI (n=61) or a time-matched control condition (n=62), with follow-up at 3 and 6months. Hypotheses predicted that 7-day point-prevalence abstinence and drinking days would favour the e-SBI condition. Results: No group differences were significant. Blinded follow-up evaluation revealed 7-day point prevalence of 75% for the e-SBI condition versus 82% for control at 3months (odds ratio=1.6) and 72% versus 73%, respectively, at 6months. Drinking days in the past 90 and mean number of drinks per week also showed no significant differences. Discussion and Conclusions: This pilot trial failed to support a single-session e-SBI for alcohol use among postpartum women, although findings at the 3-month time point suggested that greater power might confirm transient effects of the e-SBI. As efficacy is likely to vary with e-SBI content and approach, future research should leverage technology's reproducibility and modularity to isolate key components.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDrug and Alcohol Review
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Postpartum Period
alcohol
Alcohols
electronics
Drinking
Pregnancy
pregnancy
African Americans
Odds Ratio
Parturition
great power
Technology
low income
Group
evaluation

Keywords

  • Alcohol drinking
  • Computers
  • Motivation
  • Pregnancy
  • Randomised clinical trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

A randomised trial of a computer-delivered screening and brief intervention for postpartum alcohol use. / Ondersma, Steven J.; Svikis, Dace S.; Thacker, Leroy R.; Beatty, Jessica R.; Lockhart, Nancy.

In: Drug and Alcohol Review, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ondersma, Steven J. ; Svikis, Dace S. ; Thacker, Leroy R. ; Beatty, Jessica R. ; Lockhart, Nancy. / A randomised trial of a computer-delivered screening and brief intervention for postpartum alcohol use. In: Drug and Alcohol Review. 2016.
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