A quick look at slow saccades after cardiac surgery: where is the lesion?

David Solomon, Stefano Ramat, R. John Leigh, David Samuel Zee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Saccadic palsy is a reported complication of cardiac surgery. One case that came to autopsy showed midline pontine gliosis; however, in most cases, no lesions are evident on neuroimaging. Since the saccadic palsy may range from single large slow saccades to a "staircase" of very small saccades that are normal in speed, it seems plausible that more than one mechanism is possible. Here we postulate that, in those patients who make a staircase of small saccades, loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells could cause fastigial nucleus neurons to fire prematurely, thereby decelerating saccades via inhibitory burst neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)587-590
Number of pages4
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume171
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Saccades
Thoracic Surgery
Paralysis
Neurons
Cerebellar Nuclei
Gliosis
Purkinje Cells
Neuroimaging
Autopsy

Keywords

  • excitatory burst neuron
  • fastigial nucleus
  • inhibitory burst neuron
  • omnipause neurons
  • Purkinje cells
  • saccades
  • saccadic hypometria
  • saccadic palsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

A quick look at slow saccades after cardiac surgery : where is the lesion? / Solomon, David; Ramat, Stefano; Leigh, R. John; Zee, David Samuel.

In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 171, 2008, p. 587-590.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Solomon, David ; Ramat, Stefano ; Leigh, R. John ; Zee, David Samuel. / A quick look at slow saccades after cardiac surgery : where is the lesion?. In: Progress in Brain Research. 2008 ; Vol. 171. pp. 587-590.
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