A quantitative analysis of gait patterns in vestibular neuritis patients using gyroscope sensor and a continuous walking protocol

Soo Chan Kim, Joo Yeon Kim, Hwan Nyeong Lee, Hwan Ho Lee, Jae Hwan Kwon, Nam Beom Kim, Mi Joo Kim, Jong Hyun Hwang, Gyu Cheol Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Locomotion involves an integration of vision, proprioception, and vestibular information. The parieto-insular vestibular cortex is known to affect the supra-spinal rhythm generators, and the vestibular system regulates anti-gravity muscle tone of the lower leg in the same side to maintain an upright posture through the extra-pyramidal track. To demonstrate the relationship between locomotion and vestibular function, we evaluated the differences in gait patterns between vestibular neuritis (VN) patients and normal subjects using a gyroscope sensor and long-way walking protocol. Methods. Gyroscope sensors were attached to both shanks of healthy controls (n=10) and age-matched VN patients (n = 10). We then asked the participants to walk 88.8 m along a corridor. Through the summation of gait cycle data, we measured gait frequency (Hz), normalized angular velocity (NAV) of each axis for legs, maximum and minimum NAV, up-slope and down-slope of NAV in swing phase, stride-swing-stance time (s), and stance to stride ratio (%). Results: The most dominant walking frequency in the VN group was not different compared to normal control. The NAVs of z-axis (pitch motion) were significantly larger than the others (x-, y-axis) and the values in VN patients tended to decrease in both legs and the difference of NAV between both group was significant in the ipsi-lesion side in the VN group only (p=0.03). Additionally, the gait velocity of these individuals was decreased relatively to controls (1.11 ± 0.120 and 0.84 ± 0.061 m/s in control and VN group respectively, p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number58
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 11 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Vestibular Neuronitis
Gait
Walking
Leg
Locomotion
Proprioception
Gravitation
Posture
Cerebral Cortex
Muscles

Keywords

  • Gait
  • Locomotion
  • Vestibular system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

A quantitative analysis of gait patterns in vestibular neuritis patients using gyroscope sensor and a continuous walking protocol. / Kim, Soo Chan; Kim, Joo Yeon; Lee, Hwan Nyeong; Lee, Hwan Ho; Kwon, Jae Hwan; Kim, Nam Beom; Kim, Mi Joo; Hwang, Jong Hyun; Han, Gyu Cheol.

In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, Vol. 11, No. 1, 58, 11.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Soo Chan ; Kim, Joo Yeon ; Lee, Hwan Nyeong ; Lee, Hwan Ho ; Kwon, Jae Hwan ; Kim, Nam Beom ; Kim, Mi Joo ; Hwang, Jong Hyun ; Han, Gyu Cheol. / A quantitative analysis of gait patterns in vestibular neuritis patients using gyroscope sensor and a continuous walking protocol. In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation. 2014 ; Vol. 11, No. 1.
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AU - Lee, Hwan Ho

AU - Kwon, Jae Hwan

AU - Kim, Nam Beom

AU - Kim, Mi Joo

AU - Hwang, Jong Hyun

AU - Han, Gyu Cheol

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